16 posts in this topic

okay, so, first off...i'm not sure if this is the place to ask this on here or not, so somebody let me know, haha.

I'm considering getting a Northeast shader frame to do a build on...does anybody have an opinion on these frames? Good? Bad? I'm assuming the brass ones are pretty hefty...

And what happened to Paulo Fernando frames? I built on a few and really liked em...now poof! I cannot yet make frames...and really enjoy doing builds.

Cheers!

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I think your treading into questionable territory with that question. Especially since this site is brought to you buy a machine builder. I believe the legacy of the Northeast shader goes back to Sailor Barney. Baba in LA spent a bit of time with him near the end of his life so you might get some info from him. Several years ago one of the tat rags did an article about Sailor Barney right before he passed. I bought one in 93 and used it for several years. I was getting tattooed by Henry Goldfield at the time and he was using one. Much of my own back piece was made with a Northeast Shader assembled and used by Filip Leu. This machine pushed a 21 mag for hours.

I've only dabbled in the machine thing so I'm no expert on the mechanics. With that in mind, I say most machines are fairly similar. All the action is in the way the spring works and it takes time to figure out how you like your machines to work. Support Artist/ Builders to find what you like, then emulate. I know the coastal is geometrically different now than it was in the 90's, not sure if they changed the Northeast as well. Don't know if that helps you or not. I say build on as many different frames as you want to.

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I think your treading into questionable territory with that question. Especially since this site is brought to you buy a machine builder. I believe the legacy of the Northeast shader goes back to Sailor Barney. Baba in LA spent a bit of time with him near the end of his life so you might get some info from him. Several years ago one of the tat rags did an article about Sailor Barney right before he passed. I bought one in 93 and used it for several years. I was getting tattooed by Henry Goldfield at the time and he was using one. Much of my own back piece was made with a Northeast Shader assembled and used by Filip Leu. This machine pushed a 21 mag for hours.

I've only dabbled in the machine thing so I'm no expert on the mechanics. With that in mind, I say most machines are fairly similar. All the action is in the way the spring works and it takes time to figure out how you like your machines to work. Support Artist/ Builders to find what you like, then emulate. I know the coastal is geometrically different now than it was in the 90's, not sure if they changed the Northeast as well. Don't know if that helps you or not. I say build on as many different frames as you want to.

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Thank you, man. I definately want to learn more history of machines and continue to learn and grow as a machine maker. i've really enjoyed what little i've done so far and some machines are just so cool looking that i know i gotta have one. i agree with you that one way to improve my machine vocabulary is to seek out machines by others and i intend to do much more of that in the future than i have already. i do not have aspirations of making alot of machines and trying to push my way into an already saturated market...i just love the process and the knowledge. Thank you again, Dean.

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I could be wrong. I'm new to this forum. But this is a PUBLIC forum. Lets try and keep alittle of the secrets away from the scratchers eh? Not saying that what was said here is wrong by any means but most forums I post on try to keep this stuff private.

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Like I said Aaron, Questionable territory. I'm thinking private messaging might be a good way to handle some of these issues. I'm not looking to give away info, or enable those who haven't "paid dues" . On the other hand its nice to talk a little history and mention things that are no "secret" to any artist halfway paying attention. I think its good to hold back on some info, however every tattoo that goes down , professional or not , reflects on the art and industry as a whole.With that in mind, I would hope that all tattooers professional or not are at least heading down a path of acceptable tattooing. Anyway While this is in no way a place to learn about the technical aspects of tattooing. The basics of tattooing have been available to the general public for decades, ie. Milton Zies, Owen Jensen, Percy Waters In the early to mid 1900's, And then With Huck Spaulding in the Late 1900's. The real "Secret is this...... so listen up, WORK HARD, GET TATTOOED BY PEOPLE BETTER THAN YOURSELF. CHEERS!!!

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Its funny, I totally blew up in the past over somebody going what I felt to be over the line. I don't know if lines were crossed in this case. But hey, thats where the fun is at. If we weren't into crossing lines, we wouldn't be consumed by tattooing. Plus it gets boring talking about pop culture, I'm into tattoos. I guess I like some MMA and motorcycles too.

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Good morning everyone. First and foremost I would like to say thank you for posting here at Last Sparrow Tattoo as well as those who thoughtfully and respectfully responded to this great conversation. I did also want to thank those who opted not to weigh in on this conversation and regulated their reactions to keep the site positive. This is why Scott and I started this to make a passionate, positive, constructive, and progressive tattoo ezine and tattoo forum on the the internet for tattooers and tattoo collectors. We have seen some pretty heartless negative stuff on the internet related to tattooing and it sucks. So with that, this is in fact a public forum so I know a few of the tattooers have been Pm'ing with one another about stuff but for the most part when it comes to machines decide to stay silent. Some in fact post their machines for sale on the site and it is up to them to fulfill orders/request based on their discreations and the purchasers. Here is a great post that an LSTer wrote on some tattoo machines Here is a great post that an LSTer wrote on some tattoo machines

In case no one has seen this here is one of Scott Sylvia's blog post about what he wants from the site

Then this is one of the first blogs on the site when we launched it about three months ago I wrote on how Scott and I came to developing this, Last Sparrow Tattoo

Thanks again to everyone who has joined this new venture Scott and I are trying out to as Scott would say, "take tattooing back from the douchbags".

Until next time.....keep the thoughtful and productive post coming and have a good day!!

Lochlan

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I have been drinking coffee and this thread has been running around in my mind since I posted the above and then remembered that I hadn't visited the Dringenberg Blog for awhile as I am always impressed with their work. A quick tale, I remember the first time I met Dan some years ago as we share many mutual friends and I was down South for one of our mutual friends house warming parties. We were introduced and he was a very nice guy and it was a pleasure to meet him as I had always heard great things about him form many who truly respect him and hold him in high regards. That same month I was back and forth between the Bay Area and helLA every three or four days for work so on one of the trips we ran out to his shop to use his welder for welding some aluminum on an alternator bracket that had broke on a friends 350. As we walked in to the crammed space it was impressive seeing all the guys working hard and passionately on tattoo machines and equipment. I have always been impressed by tattoo machine builders and could watch for hours all the fine tuning and patience that goes into each machine.

With that being said, I also saw on this on Tim Hendrick's blog Tim Hendrick's Saltwater Tattoo Blog

Dan Dringenberg Interview

Published on November 22, 2010 in Blog. Closed

I just finally got the opportunity to read the Dan Dringenberg interview in the new Tattoo Artist Magazine, and let’s face it, Dan tells it like it is. I truly enjoy talking with Dan about things like the tattoo business, new machine building ideas, past tattoo stories and new ones that are happening now. One thing I love about our conversations is that Dan never fails to tell it straight and give me his honest opinion on things, even if the truth hurts. This interview is the straight up Dan that I know and it’s about time someone printed his words. Read it. Learn from it.

“…and it’s like the three things I try to do from now on are, each person I meet , try to leave them touched, inspired, and motivated. If I can do that, I’m doing my part to help make tattooing, and everything we do with tattooing, a little bit better.” – Dan Dringenberg

Order your copy today - www.tattooartistmagazine.com

www.dringenbergtattoocompany.com

So go buy this interview in Tattoo Artist Magazine!

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I really enjoyed the interview with Mr. Dringenberg in the new TAM. Seems like I love em all, haha. there's always something important I get from all of them. Lately, the things that have been standing out the most, maybe even sometimes more than the beautiful tattoos, is the sense of honoring the craft of tattooing and conducting yourself in a manner that upholds and advances the best aspects of it while making a living doing something we love and are captivated by. And with this ethos firmly in my mind, I feel regretful that I started this thread in the way that I did, instead of just trying to make an individual connection in the form of a private message, as would have been more correct. I have never in my life been immune to brain farts, however much i ever wished otherwise, hahaha. But, some good came of it, I guess: the link to the blog on Pike machines and the mention of the Dan Dringenberg interview. Thanks to Dean and Lochlan for your positivity.

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I started building machines about 8 or 9 years ago and have learned 90% thru trial and error. I did ask a few questions along the way to builders who I respected but always in a private e-mail. Sometimes even then I would not get a direct answer, hehehe. I've made a lot of stuff that did not work good but I learned the hard way and it has made it much more gratifying to be where I am now. I know the feeling to want to learn and not knowing where to start but keep on thinking and pushing thru the process and it will come.

Yes the Dringenberg interview has stirred some stuff up but the man has paid his dues fo sho. Larry

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thanks for the hat tip to Dannys interview...we actually did it two years ago...but his points are timeless....It was actually 56 pages but the mag cut it down. I wish they had published it completely...I have been contemplating doing a symposium on people that have done conventions with Danny....As i have done a few and everyone I know that does them with him it takes on a mythical quality.

I just interviewed Jack Rudy for my next submission...we did it real late at the state of grace convention which was perfect i was delirious and Jack was brilliant and articulate...I am real anxious to see how everyone likes that one....

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thanks for the hat tip to Dannys interview...we actually did it two years ago...but his points are timeless....It was actually 56 pages but the mag cut it down. I wish they had published it completely...I have been contemplating doing a symposium on people that have done conventions with Danny....As i have done a few and everyone I know that does them with him it takes on a mythical quality.

I just interviewed Jack Rudy for my next submission...we did it real late at the state of grace convention which was perfect i was delirious and Jack was brilliant and articulate...I am real anxious to see how everyone likes that one....

Fifty-six pages, hot damn and good to see you back on here. Would love to see your stuff in a regular blog on the site as I am sure many others would!!!! But understand the need and desire(s) to submit to magazines and see in print. Remember we are also really pushing the Tattoo Ezine part of the site so if there are things that the magaziness don't want or you want to double it up please feel free to. Can't wait for the Jack Rudy and keep us posted on your work!!!!!

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sorry i haven't seen this post i have been real busy at the shop lately which means i have an ass load of drawing to do so no time on this key board. just so you know nathan you haven't done anything wrong. we try to keep all things technical about tattooing and special technics to private messages. i want to promote tattooing in all ways wether that be you learning to build machines or people getting better at drawing, what ever the case may be we want that to happen. the one main thing we want is this to not turn into a knitting circle, people have posted some cool machine shit up, if you want you can private message me about machines they are the hammer of our trade and you should develop a basic knowledge of the the tools. hope this finds you well, thanks scott

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