peps1

Reference material.

16 posts in this topic

Ok so i have a consult this Saturday for my ribs to be tattooed by a well known Ausssie, who specializes in Japanese tattoo.

So i was told to bring in any reference material i have on the day.

Just wondering how much reference material i should bring in. Especially if someone specializes in it. I don't feel its necessary to bring in a picture of a lotus flower or whatever because i would expect he has done it countless times. So what exactly would i need it bring in as reference material.

Would it be bad for me to bring nothing in?

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It all depends on how specific a piece you want to end up with. If you're letting the artist have free reign and you're both familiar with the image(s) you want done, then no reference materials would be needed. If you like a specific style of Oni or dragon or samurai or you want a specific pose or other prerequisite that you want incorporated then you should bring that. Otherwise you can browse his porfolio and indicate which pieces really hit home with you so that he understands how to proceed with a drawing.

peps1, KYboy and GrayCatLove like this

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Wondering the same thing. Been jotting down notes for weeks too

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If he specializes in the style, then he will probably have great reference. As a tattooer, I tell people to bring in any reference they want if it is going to help me see what they are after, but not worry about having to assemble the tattoo for me, just show me things they like. But if he's known for japanese, he probably has a good library on the subject so bringing in a googled koi or dragon might be a little redundant, unless you are showing them a specific element. Even if you are looking to show the artist specific elements that you'd like incorporate, the best place to start (especially if they are known for a specific style) would be their own portfolio. Of course, you're not trying to have them duplicate things they've already done, but with japanese tattooing for example, you can always show them that you like the way the subject matter interacts with the background on a particular tattoo, or a color combo that catches your eye, or a common element like water or flames or something.

Graeme, daveborjes and peps1 like this

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I just collect a shitload of what I want in the tattoo and bring it with me. It can be from tattoo or art books, images from the internets, etc. For japanese style, look up things like wood block prints, silk paintings and just oriental art.

Rob

peps1 likes this

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Thanks everyone for your replies. I didn't feel it necessary to start a new thread.

So i spoke to him and he basically told me where i wanted it positioned wouldn't look good and i have to agree.

So now I'm expanding what i want from thigh to shoulder on one side of my torso. "river style"

OK so now my next questions.. WHERE DO I STOP IT.

The tattooist is telling my i should venture into a quarter/half sleeve - but atm i don't feel comfortable getting any part sleeved yet.

on the other hand in the future when i actually decide to get a sleeve i would probably prefer to get a full sleeve at once and not try to tie into another tattoo mid arm.

I currently have a full back piece and this half torso is going to tie into that.

So could anyone please give me some advice on what i should be doing.

1. Where do i end a full back and half torso without a sleeve.

2. Will it look stupid without a sleeve - or start to a sleeve.

I am open for suggestions from both here and the tattooist.

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If you want to get a sleeve someday and you like your artist, then I'm sure he could leave it in a way that could be continued down the arm later when you settle on an idea for a sleeve. As always, the never-fail advice is: talk to your artist. Definitely let him know you're not ready for a sleeve yet and talk about your options with him. The only useful advice you'll get on here is if some one has been through the same situation. But your artist will know where to end the tattoo and work within your comfort zone better than any one on here.

gougetheeyes likes this

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Any updates on the tattoo? Out of interest who is the artist?

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This question is the reason I joined. I gathered a massive pile of reference material and have two books of sketches. Then I decided I wanted Alex Reinke to tattoo me so it's all worthless unless he says no lol:p

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Any updates on the tattoo? Out of interest who is the artist?

Um sorry for not replying earlier, i don't get on much, anyway this is a photo from 2months ago. The rest of the blackwork is just about done. The artist is Kian Forreal his website: Home | Authentink Studio - Traditional Japanese Tattooing by Sydney Tattoo Artist - HORISUMI - Kian Forreal & Crew Sydney Tattoo Shops & Sydney Tattoo Studios AustraliaAuthentink Studio – Traditional Japanese Tattooing by Sydney Tattoo Artist &

Here is the picture i dont have a current one so this will have to do, i will probably take one once the the blackwork is finished..

e8fc80dc0a1911e3b72422000aa821e3_7.jpg

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I would suggest you bring as many as you deem sufficient. Your artist is supposed to be working with you on what you want. So don't be shy to voice out.

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Looks great @peps1

I've been following him on Instagram for a while now. Tell him to take a damn straight up and down picture for the love of FSM.

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I usually get some of the things I like by that artist from past tattoos and tell him something like this. Or from other artist that have similar styles. I do leave a lot of it to the artist!

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