Lochlan

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7 hours ago, polliwog said:

Man. Having major thigh-eagle jealousy.  I can't imagine how great that must look in person.

I'll show you next time I see you.  He put so much nice detail into it in the patterns and textures in the wings, in the branches.     I'm going to have to stop wearing pants just so I can look at it all the time.

@Devious6 You can never go wrong with an eagle.

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29or90n.jpg

I picked up this little heart and dagger at a local shop's flash event. Didn't realize until I got home that the top of the handle is jacked up. :38_worried: I think it'll be an easy fix so I'll just swing by one afternoon after it's healed and ask him to fix up the diamond-y part. Don't really blame the guy considering how insanely busy the shop was that day. Other than the handle, I love it, and it helps fill in an annoying gap nicely.

EDIT: Silly me, I forgot to give credit. Atom Lenhart at Golden Ages in Lancaster, PA did this. I've been tattooed by two guys in that shop now and will probably get a second from Atom (I have an idea he would be awesome at) and will probably get stuff from the other two guys too.

Edited by Synesthesia

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@Mark Bee Is that supposed to make me feel better? :8_laughing: I'm normally forgiving of an artist's mistakes, but this uneven handle is going to drive me crazy! I need to stop by at another shop in the same town sometime to let another guy who tattooed me get healed photos of what he did, so I figure I'll just pop in to both shops someday.

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@Bmore I remember being blown away when chad posted that tattoo.  Such a great one!

Thanks man. It was one of those deals where I didn't entirely know what I was getting til I got to the shop. As you can imagine, I was thrilled with what he came up with.

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I think that's the most fun way to get a tattoo. I'm getting tattooed by him on July 8th and have zero clue at the moment. Planning on picking something out of his book of drawings.  @Bmore

@Synesthesia I think you are worried over litterally nothing. Your tattoo looks great. 

Edited by Rob I

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6 hours ago, Rob I said:

I think that's the most fun way to get a tattoo. I'm getting tattooed by him on July 8th and have zero clue at the moment. Planning on picking something out of his book of drawings.  @Bmore

@Synesthesia I think you are worried over litterally nothing. Your tattoo looks great. 

I guess I'm just not observant enough - it took until I knes exactly where to look before I saw the difference in the handle. I also think it looks great!

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@marley mission Thanks! Chelsea Kotzur at True Blue in ATX. She stays really low key, but is really an incredible painter, in my opinion. She really got me comfortable with serious tattooing and I love love love her lady heads. So I asked her if she would do a big piece on me. I gave her the elements and let her go nuts. Means a lot more to me than if it was from a big name I was getting as a collector that I didn't have a relationship with. 

 

https://www.instagram.com/chelseakotzurtattoo/

Edited by Isotope

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