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Got this rad biker skull guy from @sour_jon Jon Gray at the Moncton Convention yesterday. Turns out its not a german SS skull with a stick grenade through the head, but a biker guy with a piston through the head. Shows what I know about bikes/cars!

Still love it. Going back today to knock out a few more.

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Edited by a_beukeveld

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On 25/09/2016 at 1:46 PM, Marwin3000 said:

Thanks! So glad I'm done!

Thanks! No worries! Chad is also super fast! That's also part of why I chose him to do my chest piece. Great guy!

Thanks! Yes, that's the price to pay! Luckily I don't have to do it again!

I was talking to Chris Anthon about Chad yesterday and about how much he hurts. He had his face done, and said he practically outlined the whole thong with one pass. No wonder people say he hurts! The long drags are always the worst part!

Edited by a_beukeveld

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I had actually seen this piece recently and initially thought the same thing - but as a WWII buff and former Army officer/military historian I quickly realized it was a biker. I had several WWII German helmets when I was a kid in the 60's that had been painted for use by bikers. One was chromed, the other painted purple.

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9 minutes ago, Devious6 said:

I had actually seen this piece recently and initially thought the same thing - but as a WWII buff and former Army officer/military historian I quickly realized it was a biker. I had several WWII German helmets when I was a kid in the 60's that had been painted for use by bikers. One was chromed, the other painted purple.

I thought the idea of an SS skull with a german grenade through the head was a rad idea. Like something an American GI would get. I actually havent seen many anti-nazi, anti-Japanese american tattoos around. Wonder why that is.

I know there's the anti-chinese flash from the early 1910s, but nothing on the axis powers. Strange.

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I think it could be that our psyche was more focused on projecting our own images of strength and patriotism. Flags, eagles, battle ships, tanks, crossed infantry rifles - few people then would have ever considered putting on something that reflected the enemy we were fighting, the enemy our Nation was totally committed to defeat. I think that's why I love my eagle so much - it reflects the strength of our country - the one I served and love. Not perfect but mine. May be it's just me - the old retired Army guy - but images and emotions still matter to me. Or maybe I'm just having one of those introspective days. :8_laughing:

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My Dad went into the Marines at the end of WWII - this is him in July 1946, just scored as high shooter in his training platoon at Parris Island. His tattoo was a killer skull with a snake intertwined in the eyes and mouth. I wish I could show him mine now - he died in 1997 while I was commanding a battalion in Bosnia - but he was my incentive to finally do it. I'm still looking for that rifle - serial number 2860035. I've come close to it and have several M1 Garands in my collection. I know that he would have never considered putting something on him that reflected an image of Nazi Germany, Imperial Japan, North Korea or China. Still, he loved the oriental and German cultures and visited Asia and Europe many times over the years before he died.

 

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My grandparents were born towards the end of the second world war, so none of them faught. My dutch grandfather remembers german soldier mowing down their farm with tanks, and allie forces lobbing grenades, tho. My Canadian grandmothers father was a front-line medic during the war. He returned home after the war, but died quickly of sone disease he cought over there. I forget what he died of. On my mother's side, there are 3 generations of nurses, going back to my great grandmother, who died at the age of 98, and who was named after Edeth Cavall. I understand my strong pull towards nurse imagery, hense why my center chest piece is the World War I image of the Rose of No-Mans Land. Could also explain why I want to be a tattooer now, and why I wanted to be a paramedic before that.

That same grandfather of mine has a British made Le Enfield MK. III that he bought at a garage sale in the 70s. Cool gun. Im no expert, so I dont know much about it, but it might have been used during the first world war, because I know they used Le Enfields during that time.

Edited by a_beukeveld

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Jon just knocked these out on my arms last night. Really stoked. I felt so sick that day, so Im glad I was able to power through it. Just chugged apple juice and soda to keep myself concious through it all. Thankfully arms are easy spots for tattoos, and my arm was asleep for the diamond lady because of the awkward position, so it didnt hurt that much.

Getting a Fudo Myo-o cat by Chris Anthon today. Will post photos latter.

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2 hours ago, a_beukeveld said:

Jon just knocked these out on my arms last night. Really stoked. I felt so sick that day, so Im glad I was able to power through it. Just chugged apple juice and soda to keep myself concious through it all. Thankfully arms are easy spots for tattoos, and my arm was asleep for the diamond lady because of the awkward position, so it didnt hurt that much.

Getting a Fudo Myo-o cat by Chris Anthon today. Will post photos latter.

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I love how so many of the cool tattoos I see on instagram turn out to be on LST posters! Keep up the collecting.

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Finished my upper arm this weekend at the Richmond convention with the (holdout) inner bicep area. Thanks, @darcynutt! She did the outer/shoulder portion of it last year at the convention, and I booked her Saturday to go ahead and finish all the way around. She made it look like it was all done at the same time, and I'm thrilled. She once again used my own aquarium fish in the design. 

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On 9/25/2016 at 5:31 PM, ItsNewport said:

Picked this one up from Marc Nava at the London tattoo convention yesterday. Such a nice guy and i had a great time being tattooed by him. Really wish i was at the convention today/tomorrow as there seemed to be a LOT of artists taking walk ups that had time (Frankie Carracioli, for example, was in the booth with Marc and didn't do a single tattoo on Friday, at least not by the time i left around 8pm).

Bumped in to a few LSTers too, wish i knew their names here but it was a pleasure seeing you all, even managed to stumble across my main man @Iwar when i was literally on my way out of the convention.

 

 

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Great meeting you there, and it was cool to hang out with you and Mark!

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