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kylegrey

Christian Warlich .

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This thread contains pictures of German SS Officers tattooed by Christian Warlich . I think we are all sensible enough thats there's no need to address the Nazi equation , after all if I didn't mention it ,its not apparent . Anyway thanks to kind permission by Bill Loika heres a rare glimpse of some great old pics.

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Thank you for posting these pictures.

I can't get past the 'nazi question.' But very much appreciate having the photos out there.

Anyone know what is up with the Phantom of the Opera mask the second picture? More interesting that blurring out a face.

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The SS wan't real big on having troopers, let alone officers, pose for pretty-much-nekkid pictures, so I'd guess the gent didn't want his Uncle to see him.

Great stuff, Kyle...but you have to ask yourself why a Schutzstaffel Offizier would have an Ami flag tattooed on his chest, and why his tattooer would have it on his wall as flash in wartime!

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@Dan S good point about the stars and stripes dude ,he must be one of the good guys , I think there will be more pics so I typed officers in my original post . No bout about the other guy his name was Obersturmbahn Furher member of the Waffen SS .

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@Dan S good point about the stars and stripes dude ,he must be one of the good guys , I think there will be more pics so I typed officers in my original post . No bout about the other guy his name was Obersturmbahn Furher member of the Waffen SS .

"Obersturmbahn Furher" was his rank title in the military, not his name. I doubt we will ever know his name.

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I'll get all picky n shit...

Obersturmbannführer was an SS Field-Grade officer rank, roughly equivalent to a Lieutenant-Colonel, so no, he wouldn't have wanted his face shown or his name known!

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Curiouser and curiouser. I'm trying to wrestle my way through „Das blaue Weib“ und andere Zirkusfrauen. Theoretische Aspekte von Tätowierungen unter besonderer Berücksichtigung von „Tätowierten Damen“ in Zirkus und Schaubuden untersucht am Beispiel der Sammlung Walther Schönfeldd. Interesting task for a non german speaker.

This is in there:

17-c1a399067f.jpg

Subtitled: Christian Warlichs Werbekarte mit drei Rückenansichten. Ohne Datum. Die Frau links zeigt die Tätowierte Dame Lady Viola, Most Beautiful Lady in The World

Now, my German isn't fab but I think it says: Christian Warlichs work card with 3 back views. No date. The woman on the left is tattooed lady Lady Viola, Most Beautiful Lady in The World.

Now, I happen to know Viola (aka Ethel Vangi) was tattooed by Frank Graf. Here's a back view of her and it does seem to clearly match.

viola2.jpg

and another

cd5456041006728473246a6d3bbfeefd.jpg

So, what's all that about then?

- - - Updated - - -

Oh, sorry, das blaue wieb is another alias for Djita Salome (born Genoveva Forst), already had photos a plenty of her here but I still haven't worked out if she's one of his works.

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I have a fascination for stuff like this and the Russian prison tattoos. There's a lady at a Chinese restaurant a girlfriend and I like to go to, and she had a tattoo forcibly applied to her face while in a labor camp because of her religion. Super nice lady, but so sad. The amazing thing is she holds herself with such poise and dignity and considers it a testament to her faith. Makes it truly lovely.

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