Inkhead

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Hey guys, I am new to the forum. I am 32 years old and have just three tattoos, though I want more. The three tattoos I have are all in black ink, and on my upper left and right arms. I am interested in covering some kanji symbols on my left arm with a colorful, elaborate tattoo but I have to do some research and exploring to accomplish that. In addition to my arm tattoos, I actually had my scalp tattooed with dots to disguise my hair loss, but that was a cosmetic tattoo so I don't really count that one LOL. Anyway, great to be here and I look forward to learning all I can.

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Hey Joe, thanks for the welcome man! I live in New Orleans Louisiana and if you know of a good artist down here that you'd recommend Id be much obliged. The kanji symbols on my left arm are pretty big, they extend from my shoulder to my elbow (I'll try to upload a photo) and it is two symbols, one on top of the other. I got them 14 years ago when I didn't understand that tattoos are best if they are unique and original artwork, as opposed to some clip art off the wall or some book. My hope is to cover them up and try and get some authentic tat that actually means something.

As far has the hair loss, I've been shaving my head for about 4 years now. Cool idea about the tiger or panther, Ive thought about getting something on the back of my head. The tattooed dots on my scalp pretty much just cover the fleshy areas and are supposed to replicate hair follicles and give kind of a "bald by choice" look. I want to get more dots on my scalp in some areas but don't want to go back to cosmetic place (it is all the way across the country). I want to go to a reputable tattoo artist who can possibly help cover my arm kanji as well. My concerns on the scalp are, most of the cosmetic field claims that traditional tattoo artists cannot do this kind of cosmetic tattooing on the scalp b/c (1)" their equipment is not right for it" and (2) "the ink at traditional places contains too much iron oxide and the black will turn blue and/or migrate." (3)and that "traditional tattoo artists insert the ink too deep." It seems to me that a good tattoo artist could easily do dots on the head; Ive seen some amazing elaborate scalp tattoos but I just do not know enough about tattoo equipment, inks, and the human skin to know for sure.

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Wow those are all awesome portfolios, thanks Joe! They are Some of the best I've seen of online New Orleans artists. I will most definitely go holler at those guys and check them out. I've looked online at their shops but Nice to have some specific artists in mind.

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I have a question about black tattoo inks. I want to get more black ink on my left arm, partly to cover existing tattoo, but I have noticed with my other black tattoos that they have turned to a slightly blue-ish color over time. Granted, I used to spend a lot of time in the sun without sunscreen, and I know that UV damage can fade and color-change tattoos. My question is, do I need to ask the tattoo shop for a specific brand of black ink?(or would that be a douchebag move?) Are there some black inks that are less prone to turn blue-ish over time and remain black, or is this effect simply due to sun-exposure and possibly my individual skin type? (I am pale-skinned). I have also heard that black inks with high metal contents are more likely to appear blue over time.

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I have a question about black tattoo inks. I want to get more black ink on my left arm, partly to cover existing tattoo, but I have noticed with my other black tattoos that they have turned to a slightly blue-ish color over time. Granted, I used to spend a lot of time in the sun without sunscreen, and I know that UV damage can fade and color-change tattoos. My question is, do I need to ask the tattoo shop for a specific brand of black ink?(or would that be a douchebag move?) Are there some black inks that are less prone to turn blue-ish over time and remain black, or is this effect simply due to sun-exposure and possibly my individual skin type? (I am pale-skinned). I have also heard that black inks with high metal contents are more likely to appear blue over time.

go to a reputable artist, and stay out of the sun.

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Cool deal, yea I figured maybe the more reputable artists are more on the cutting edge of the top quality inks and use better equipment all around. Yea I avoid the sun now after realizing the effects UV damage has on tattoos. I am sorry that I did not do that from the start

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Hey guys, I just have a quick question for those of you who may know about this sort of thing. I had a cosmetic scalp tattoo(Scalp Micropigmentation), hundreds of tiny black dots tattooed on scalp to replicate hair follicles, a couple of years ago. Two spots have faded and I want to get them touched up at a reputable standard tattoo shop b/c I cannot afford to fly back across the country to the cosmetic place. Is this possible? The cosmetic industry claims that standard tattooing uses the wrong equipment and inks for this sort of thing and that by attempting to do this at a regular tattoo shop will cause pigment migration and color change. On the website of the largest scalp tattoo provider it states:

(1)"the metal content in SMP pigments is extremely low, far lower than traditional tattoo inks. Unlike tattoo inks, SMP pigments will not change color over time."

(2)"Pigments are preferred because they resistant to stress forces, they do not dissolve in water, they are not easily removed once injected into the collagen microstructure of the dermis and most importantly, they are much better at resisting UV radiation, which can be extremely damaging to a compound’s chemical bonds. Pigments are also relatively inert, do not respond to most biochemical reactions in the skin and can be made perfectly sterile for injection."

(3)"One significant difference is the depth at which they are injected into the skin. Tattoo pigments are usually injected into the middle dermis, below the epidermis. Cosmetic pigments are usually deposited into the very top of the dermis. This means they are closer to the epidermis, and more easily degraded by UV radiation. Tattoo inks are less affected by UV radiation since they receive less light deeper down in the skin, but they are subject to more white blood cell agents (such as phagocytic cells)."

Is any of this true? Any feedback is much appreciated, and I apologize for this cosmetic question, as I understand this site is more about the wearable artwork side of tattooing which I am also interested in learning more about.

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If the pigment they use is so amazing I'm sure we'd be using it in our shops. Truth is, we probably are. I'm certainly not an expert in cosmetic tattooing (if it's really that different) but tattooing is thousands of years old, and a constant has always been that you inject ink a certain depth into the dermis and the body holds it there. It's a simple concept. The spin and propaganda is the only thing that changes.

Sorry I can't be much more help than that. :-)

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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If the pigment they use is so amazing I'm sure we'd be using it in our shops. Truth is, we probably are. I'm certainly not an expert in cosmetic tattooing (if it's really that different) but tattooing is thousands of years old, and a constant has always been that you inject ink a certain depth into the dermis and the body holds it there. It's a simple concept. The spin and propaganda is the only thing that changes.

Sorry I can't be much more help than that. :-)

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Hey, thanks KingofCosta! No you were actually very helpful. Your response is logical and makes a ton of sense and basically confirms my suspicions. It is part of these Scalp Tattoo Clinics' sales pitch to separate themselves from the rest of the tattooing world and create an illusion that they possess some new revolutionary technique, equipment (machines and needles), and inks that will accomplish a goal that a traditional tattoo artist cannot, and that goal is simply tattooing a few hundred tiny black dots onto the scalp. I know it is ridiculous, and I am actually quite embarrassed that I bought such a Bill Of Goods from one of these Scalp tattoo clinics that produced very minimal results for a much inflated price. I still have a decent amount of remaining hair, and the black dots actually do blend well with my shaved hair, but some areas have faded and the price that the place charged was absolute robbery. What is funny is that when you ask these places what separates their inks and method from Tattoo shops, they tell you that they cannot disclose this information and that it is a trade secret. On one Scalp Micropigmentation site under FAQ it states:

"What is the exact molecular structure of the SMP pigment?

This is a proprietary business secret that we will not disclose at this time as it is an integral part of the HIS business model and is key to making sure that our pigments retain a true gray scale, even under UV degradation. Many other competitors use regular tattoo inks which unfortunately, appear truly black or a gray for the first several months, only to begin breaking down at a later date to something more resembling a darker shade of blue or green."

So basically they guarantee that their product is unique, reinforce this with scare tactics (ie: go somewhere else and your head will turn blue or green), and then offer absolutely no facts to support their claims that their ink is any different from every other tattoo shop in the world. Many clinics also publish pictures of "horror story" victims' heads that have huge blue blobs of ink scattered across their scalp, probably either photo shopped or were results from amateur "home tattooing", and claim that these are results from their competitors and standard tattooing. Anyhow, I fell for the propaganda and sale's pitch like an idiot, like a typical desperate bald guy I suppose LOL, and now I just want to fill in some spots that have faded and I am leaning towards a shop in my hometown that has an outstanding reputation. I am also hoping that this same shop can do a cover up on my left arm where I have some Kanji I got 14 years ago. I'll post some pics of that tat soon. My goal there is to work it into a new sleeve, but I have no idea of the specifics just yet.

Thanks for the feedback, and again, sorry to all for the cosmetic question: I assume that the majority of the community is here for legitimate tattooing. My scalp is just my top priority to have taken care of, and If I can have some minor touchups work completed at a shop in my city without having to travel across the country I would be over the moon! Next I will be able to move onto legit tattoos.

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So is there any reason why I shouldn't go to a good, reputable tattoo shop to have more dots tattooed on my scalp? I would prefer to avoid going back to the original scalp micropigmentation clinic and having to pay airfare and travel expenses, and I really don't think they are all that good at tattooing to begin with. The more I have researched this whole cosmetic scalp tattooing thing, it just seems as though it is a bunch of propaganda and lies about needle size, ink quality, and depth of needle insertion so that they can charge a whole lot for very little work.

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Late to this thread and no experience with cosmetic tattooing - but definite experience with Nola ink possibilities. I recommend you go and talk with the guys at Eye Candy. The best artists in the area and they won't take the job just to take the job.

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Late to this thread and no experience with cosmetic tattooing - but definite experience with Nola ink possibilities. I recommend you go and talk with the guys at Eye Candy. The best artists in the area and they won't take the job just to take the job.

Thanks SStu, I appreciate the referral. I will definitely check those guys out. Been looking at their work on the website and it is the best Ive seen in the NOLA area. Even if I decide not to do scalp I'll go in and talk to them about my left arm Kanji coverup or possible add on.

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the price that the place charged was absolute robbery.

I woulda charged you out the ass also. To get me to do a tattoo that isn't a tattoo might cost you double or more.

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I woulda charged you out the ass also. To get me to do a tattoo that isn't a tattoo might cost you double or more.

Wow, I did not realize that, good to know! I actually did not have my scalp tattoo done at a tattoo shop though, but rather a scalp micropigmentation clinic. Cosmetic tattoos are actually much more expensive than traditional, and what I was charged is what they charge all of their clients. Any thoughts on this article:

Why a hair tattoo is a bad idea | SMP Debate

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To be honest I think the whole fake-hair tattoo is super goofy, but then again I'm not the one losing hair.

@hogg are you gonna start getting fake hair tats?

I already look too awesome as a bald man. To quote Holden Caulfield, "He was one of those bald guys that comb all their hair over from the side to cover up the baldness. I'd rather be bald than do that."

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