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Advice for framing silk embroidery

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I bought this silk embroidery in Hong Kong about 15 years ago and it's been sitting in the original roll since then. FINALLY I am getting around to framing it and would like advice. It has a fabric mat it looks to be glued to and the mat has a subtle pattern. Should any part of that mat be shown? A different/additional mat? What kind of frame? Me, not being very artistically creative, would just put it in a black frame. Black? Matt or gloss finish? How thick should the frame be?

Also, any idea about the artist, and what the characters mean? Does this design have any significance? I bought it simply because I loved it. The embroidery is so fine.

Some of the pictures have glare or shadows from the plastic, which I didn't completely remove to take these pictures.

Thanks!

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I bought this silk embroidery in Hong Kong about 15 years ago and it's been sitting in the original roll since then. FINALLY I am getting around to framing it and would like advice. It has a fabric mat it looks to be glued to and the mat has a subtle pattern. Should any part of that mat be shown? A different/additional mat? What kind of frame? Me, not being very artistically creative, would just put it in a black frame. Black? Matt or gloss finish? How thick should the frame be?
For the frame, I'd think black (lacquer), black and gold, or bamboo.

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I think the mat should be shown as much as possible, and have a spacer (mat board) between the fabric and the glass so the fabric has space to breathe. The mat between the glass and material (paper, fabric, etc) is vitally important otherwise you get that flocking/foxing and discoloration from having the glass pressed up against the material being framed because of the fluctuations in humidity. It is recommended that it be hard mounted (ie on a piece of veneer wood) prior to framing this way.

If you were to get it soft-mounted you could have it prepared and then hang it like a scroll on the wall (vs having it in a frame.)

These folks might be able to help you out: Framing, Matting & Mounting

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@pidjones - I was thinking black lacquer but bamboo could be nice. I would have to see it - I have trouble imagining things (which is why I posted!)

@Fala - That is a great site and description - thanks! I am thinking hard mounted at this point. There is a lot of great information on that site. When I started this quest, there was NOTHING on the internet and I wasn't having luck finding anything, so it went on the shelf...and stayed there for all this time.

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Minor diversion to the real theme of this thread - but my wife's Dad brought a back a really nice silk robe from Japan back in the '40s, and it's been stored in a plastic bag all these years. Seriously considering buying a mannequin to hang it on.

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Minor diversion to the real theme of this thread - but my wife's Dad brought a back a really nice silk robe from Japan back in the '40s, and it's been stored in a plastic bag all these years. Seriously considering buying a mannequin to hang it on.

Man, if it's that old and a really good one, you might want to get that framed too. Unless the mannequin-for-effect is more desirable. After all, any home decor could use a random mannequin.

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Man, if it's that old and a really good one, you might want to get that framed too. Unless the mannequin-for-effect is more desirable. After all, any home decor could use a random mannequin.

Problem with framing it would be a/the frame would be really large, b/you'd only get to see 1 side.

When I was a younger "adult" we always had a Christmas mannequin instead of a tree. Loved it.

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