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Specific colors like Dark Blue, Dark Purple, Maroon, Cyan

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I am trying to make up my mind about future tattoo colors. I have heard mixed things from tattoo artists (or read online) and am a little confused now.

All my current tattoos are black but I would like my upcoming tattoos to be of a different color. Colors that I prefer are dark blue, dark purple, cyan and maroon or dark brown. I read they are known to last fairly well? Can someone confirm this? Since the tattoos will be line tattoos also I don't want to go for the color that fades quickest. I'm okay with it not holding up with black ink though.

What also concerns me are the supposed toxins in colored ink. I was unable to find information about specific colors. Whatever info I read spoke of black vs. colored ink. But I would like to specifically know how toxic dark blue is or maroon, so I can decide based on my comfort level ;-).

If anyone has any new info regarding tattoos and health please share I would like to research it more. Most websites share a rather dramatic view about the health concerns and I'm not so sure that is all solid information.

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What makes tattoos hold up well over time isn't necessarily the color used, it's more the contrast with black. Black is high contrast with the skin and with most colors, so it makes other colors look brighter and helps the tattoo stay readable with age. Depending on what design you're thinking of, I honestly think you might not be able to tell much of a difference (initially) between black ink or dark purple/blue/etc. To the naked eye after it heals, it might just look black anyway with no other contrasting colors around it. But after several years, all color will fade significantly, and without having any black to anchor it, it's way more likely that a colored outline will lose readability. That's up to you to decide if that's a factor.

I don't know anything about toxins in ink. I think that probably falls under the realm of "trade secrets." People have been tattooed for thousands of years with more primitive materials than we have now, so I figure it can't be too bad for you. Again, that's kind of something you have to decide for yourself.

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This reminds me of a Dr. Drew show I heard on the radio when I was young...what is a toxin? Can you describe to me it's individual compound elements, the viruses and other contributing factors that make up it's body? People use "toxin" as a general term to describe their fantasies about what makes them fatigued, irritable, sick etc. Unless we're talking about some poisonous chemical compound from an animal, there is no such thing as a toxin. Not calling you out, just pointing out that this vague blanket term has absolutely no scientific basis - at least, none that I've heard described.

As far as harmful elements in ink, there really isn't anything to worry about in color vs black - generally. Some people are allergic to some colors. And short of devising a scientific test for it, you won't know until the ink is in. Other purported downsides, like MRIs making your skin burst into flames if they hit the tattoo, again have no solid body of research.

The best info I can give is that I have been getting inked for about five years now, and at present time I have quite a bit of the rainbow on me. That doesn't speak for every ink color from every manufacturer, but as @Synesthesia said this art form has been going on for years steadily - the odds of a bad reaction are fairly low. If you want color, get it. Just maybe think of outlining it in black so it holds well. :cool:

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What makes tattoos hold up well over time isn't necessarily the color used, it's more the contrast with black. Black is high contrast with the skin and with most colors, so it makes other colors look brighter and helps the tattoo stay readable with age. Depending on what design you're thinking of, I honestly think you might not be able to tell much of a difference (initially) between black ink or dark purple/blue/etc. To the naked eye after it heals, it might just look black anyway with no other contrasting colors around it. But after several years, all color will fade significantly, and without having any black to anchor it, it's way more likely that a colored outline will lose readability. That's up to you to decide if that's a factor.

I don't know anything about toxins in ink. I think that probably falls under the realm of "trade secrets." People have been tattooed for thousands of years with more primitive materials than we have now, so I figure it can't be too bad for you. Again, that's kind of something you have to decide for yourself.

Yeah in a way I am thinking it can't be that bad if we don't see tattooed people dropping dead everywhere, but I would prefer companies would disclose the ingredients. Ancient ink was made with simpler ingredients as far as I know like pure ash, indigo or even with breastmilk (!!) :p

It would be interesting to see how colored lines or font fade. If it simply turns lighter but doesn't look blotchy that is great. I was thinking of adding certain colored tattoos also to soften and break up the overall look, stick with a certain color theme of black, blue tones and maroon maybe...but that is just an idea of mine. Not sure it is realistic.

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This reminds me of a Dr. Drew show I heard on the radio when I was young...what is a toxin? Can you describe to me it's individual compound elements, the viruses and other contributing factors that make up it's body? People use "toxin" as a general term to describe their fantasies about what makes them fatigued, irritable, sick etc. Unless we're talking about some poisonous chemical compound from an animal, there is no such thing as a toxin. Not calling you out, just pointing out that this vague blanket term has absolutely no scientific basis - at least, none that I've heard described.

As far as harmful elements in ink, there really isn't anything to worry about in color vs black - generally. Some people are allergic to some colors. And short of devising a scientific test for it, you won't know until the ink is in. Other purported downsides, like MRIs making your skin burst into flames if they hit the tattoo, again have no solid body of research.

The best info I can give is that I have been getting inked for about five years now, and at present time I have quite a bit of the rainbow on me. That doesn't speak for every ink color from every manufacturer, but as @Synesthesia said this art form has been going on for years steadily - the odds of a bad reaction are fairly low. If you want color, get it. Just maybe think of outlining it in black so it holds well. :cool:

I apologize if toxin was the wrong term. I wanted to use a word that describes any harmful substance. In German that would be "Schadstoffe", so the word that first came to my mind was toxin, but I guess harmful substances would be more correct.

I am thinking of substances that are foreign to the human body and cause a reaction...Not directly of course as in the tattoo will make you fatigued, I am talking about a reaction to a function in the body like the endocrine system for example, which in turn could cause other imbalances. Or carcinogenic substances that don't directly cause cancer, but speed up cell division and lead to an increase of cancerous cells (cells like this are normal to the body, but when they increase in number it can become a problem etc.)

There was one site that spoke of heavy metals in tattoos...sadly not the music kind. But the body can detox from heavy metals, so hard to say if there is a longterm effect.

I am interested in all this because I dealt with many chronic health issues the past years, plus cancer and it took me about 5 years to rid myself of all of it. So if anyone would tell me the color purple has a high concentration of carcinogenic substances (f.ex.) I might reconsider.

In Germany tattoo colors were tested (though I can't find anything about dark blue, purple or maroon), and some brands were labeled as unsuitable. It seems though that German tattoo fans question these tests, because there seem to be no fool proof methods for accurately measuring levels of X. Very confusing...

http://www.testberichte.de/kosmetik-und-pflege/3286/tattoofarben.html

Please blame typos on my phone. I can't even see what I'm writing :/.

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I apologize if toxin was the wrong term. I wanted to use a word that describes any harmful substance. In German that would be "Schadstoffe", so the word that first came to my mind was toxin, but I guess harmful substances would be more correct.

I am thinking of substances that are foreign to the human body and cause a reaction...Not directly of course as in the tattoo will make you fatigued, I am talking about a reaction to a function in the body like the endocrine system for example, which in turn could cause other imbalances. Or carcinogenic substances that don't directly cause cancer, but speed up cell division and lead to an increase of cancerous cells (cells like this are normal to the body, but when they increase in number it can become a problem etc.)

There was one site that spoke of heavy metals in tattoos...sadly not the music kind. But the body can detox from heavy metals, so hard to say if there is a longterm effect.

I am interested in all this because I dealt with many chronic health issues the past years, plus cancer and it took me about 5 years to rid myself of all of it. So if anyone would tell me the color purple has a high concentration of carcinogenic substances (f.ex.) I might reconsider.

In Germany tattoo colors were tested (though I can't find anything about dark blue, purple or maroon), and some brands were labeled as unsuitable. It seems though that German tattoo fans question these tests, because there seem to be no fool proof methods for accurately measuring levels of X. Very confusing...

Tattoofarben Test

Please blame typos on my phone. I can't even see what I'm writing :/.

No, don't apologize. I assumed you were a native english speaker, or an American. Over here, there are a lot of people in the workout-super vegan-macrobiotic-hipster culture who will use the word when they're describing a load of baloney, i.e. "so glad I stopped eating gluten, I can feel the toxins leaving my body"etc.

As far as purple, I just had some put in me, so hopefully there's no carcinogenic effects! In all reality, just go to a shop you like and see if there are other tattooed people around - ask them. They won't be as shut up about any adverse effects they've had, though I highly doubt you will have any issue with color. Artists thrive on giving people pieces that last a lifetime - not art that lasts a few days before melting them like the Ark of the Covenant.

You mentioned solely color lines - my future brother in law's wife has a few of those, text done in pink, blue...they don't look good. Some of it may be the artist, some of it may be the placement (get a tattoo on your wrist and don't put sunscreen on it, it's gonna fade), but I really think you will have a much better tattoo if you surround it on both sides with black.

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This might not be completely relevant, but there are discussions about watercolor tattoos and their ability to hold over time. The similarity with your question is that these and your thoughts are for tattoos that do not have black. Maybe you might find something useful searching "watercolor tattoos." Here is a start in the middle of a thread: http://www.lastsparrowtattoo.com/forum/general-tattoo-discussion/2396-what-makes-good-tattoo-page27.html#post112953

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No, don't apologize. I assumed you were a native english speaker, or an American. Over here, there are a lot of people in the workout-super vegan-macrobiotic-hipster culture who will use the word when they're describing a load of baloney, i.e. "so glad I stopped eating gluten, I can feel the toxins leaving my body"etc.

As far as purple, I just had some put in me, so hopefully there's no carcinogenic effects! In all reality, just go to a shop you like and see if there are other tattooed people around - ask them. They won't be as shut up about any adverse effects they've had, though I highly doubt you will have any issue with color. Artists thrive on giving people pieces that last a lifetime - not art that lasts a few days before melting them like the Ark of the Covenant.

You mentioned solely color lines - my future brother in law's wife has a few of those, text done in pink, blue...they don't look good. Some of it may be the artist, some of it may be the placement (get a tattoo on your wrist and don't put sunscreen on it, it's gonna fade), but I really think you will have a much better tattoo if you surround it on both sides with black.

Oh haha...well I am not a hipster or vegan, but I do eat Paleo which is basically just meat, veggies and fruits (no grains or dairy or sugar, aside from occasional exceptions) and in turn got rid of my autoimmune diseases and can plan tattoos now instead of having to be on meds :) I always say these things aren't a cure it all for everyone but many have predisposed issues and react to certain foods differently. I wasn't able to digest starches for a while but avoiding them helped my gut heal and I can eat tricky foods now in moderation.

Back on topic - I think with the designs I have in mind a black outline might be difficult....since the are just lines. Or maybe there is a way of tattooing with black lines and adding blue or maroon shading? I really don't know.

I attached images of dark blue and maroon line tattoos and some of the designs I scribbled on myself. I might prefer the text in old Anglo Saxon script, and the bindrune on my wrist I was thinking of doing in blue while the other connecting lines are another color possibly (the eye is a tattoo)

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This might not be completely relevant, but there are discussions about watercolor tattoos and their ability to hold over time. The similarity with your question is that these and your thoughts are for tattoos that do not have black. Maybe you might find something useful searching "watercolor tattoos." Here is a start in the middle of a thread: http://www.lastsparrowtattoo.com/forum/general-tattoo-discussion/2396-what-makes-good-tattoo-page27.html#post112953

Oh true, I haven't considered that watercolor tattoos are technically the same. Thanks!

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You should check out Colin Dale's tattooing, I've got a feeling you would find it interesting.

Thank you I'll have a look!

Sooooo I can't feel the gluten toxins leaving my hipster body. Well now I'm just embarrassed.

I have some outlines that are blue and I can tell you that while they have held up it isn't near the way my blacks have held up. I wish all my outlines were done in black

Were they done in a darker blue? And how long have you had them?

There are always more toxins to avoid. Maybe you're in meed of a juice fast..

Jk

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