Sick

Choosing the right artist.

Recommended Posts

Hello,

After reading a lot around here I noticed that knowledgeable people are all about choosing the right artist for their pieces, or even choosing an artist they like and going for something new with that artist because they trust him.

I'd like your help in deciding what artist would be good for me. I'll show you m short-list of romanian tattoo artists and maybe you cna tel me what you think, who do you think is good and who isn't :)

I hope this will be fun for everyone and maybe even be a nice surprise to discover some interesting artists from Romania and not only helpful for me!

Thanks!

For now, I'd want to get a lion head [ or maybe even a body or a paw ... ] b&g but i wouldn't say no to a bit of colour [ maybe around the eyes or the mane. Here are the artist I researched and shortlisted so far, all from Romania.

The guys at RadicalInk seem to do a very good job. I especially like Andrei Chirita.

My favorite right now is Biex

I also think Shu Dorin and Volken are good too.

My last two options are : Adda and she will come to a convention in Romania soon: Tattoo Artists 2015 - Transilvania Tattoo Expo There might also be interesting to choose someone from here but I don't know any of these guys.

And lastly: Razvan Grecu

I know this is a lot of links but I hope we'll all find something interesting to talk about and help me go with someone professional that will make me a great tattoo for ages :) All these guys and gals looks great to me, but being such a noob I really can't tell quality from illusion of quality!

Thanks a lot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For their style (not my favorite style), I'd think Chirita for that new style stuff or Volken for dotwork/geometric. I'd want to see the photos that Biex (some of those I really was not happy with) and others did photo-real FROM to see if they are true to their subjects. That is why I don't like photo-real. and artist's impression of what someone might look like in a certain pose (someone well documented like Marilyn or Johnny Dep as Jack Sparrow) has much more freedom and can do so much better. Even a movie still can be made good - but a photo of a child or the like is so much harder to portray accurately. I'd rather see something produced by the artist from a video. My own tattoo of my wife was done as a cameo so that those imperfections in the art would only add, not subtract from the beauty.

And I write this as someone who picked the wrong artist. Once. He might have been good with the styles that you show here, but he totally mis-read my request and I am still not well pleased even after corrections. Although there are sooooo many great artists in the traditional styles, and also in the newer styles, there are some that are very hit-and-miss. I would like to see some of their BAD work, too. I'm sure the very good artists don't hit it perfect every time, but they will produce a LOT of great art. Be very careful of small, select portfolios.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
For their style (not my favorite style), I'd think Chirita for that new style stuff or Volken for dotwork/geometric. I'd want to see the photos that Biex (some of those I really was not happy with) and others did photo-real FROM to see if they are true to their subjects. That is why I don't like photo-real. and artist's impression of what someone might look like in a certain pose (someone well documented like Marilyn or Johnny Dep as Jack Sparrow) has much more freedom and can do so much better. Even a movie still can be made good - but a photo of a child or the like is so much harder to portray accurately. I'd rather see something produced by the artist from a video. My own tattoo of my wife was done as a cameo so that those imperfections in the art would only add, not subtract from the beauty.

And I write this as someone who picked the wrong artist. Once. He might have been good with the styles that you show here, but he totally mis-read my request and I am still not well pleased even after corrections. Although there are sooooo many great artists in the traditional styles, and also in the newer styles, there are some that are very hit-and-miss. I would like to see some of their BAD work, too. I'm sure the very good artists don't hit it perfect every time, but they will produce a LOT of great art. Be very careful of small, select portfolios.

UGH. I really don't lknow what to say, how can I ask for bad tattooes? And also I don't really understand what photo-real means.

Can you give me an example what of Biex you didn't like? Just to understand what I'm looking for.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heey, Another noob here.

I would go with either https://instagram.com/razvangrecu89/ , https://www.facebook.com/pages/Chirita-Andrei/481484761910374 or Volken.

Why? Well they're lines look very solid to me which is better as your tattoo age.

Shu lines looks to scribbly to me. Dorin uses alot of vibrant colours, u want B&G.

no opinion on https://www.facebook.com/adda.transilvaniatattoo.

This is my opinion. Im not a artist, also still need to get my first tattoo, this is just what i learned so far being on this forum.

Forgot about Biex. His/Her style im not sure. Some of the tattoos look washed out (I guess that is the design) but im not sure how this will age. For exampe the tree tattoo on the artists website.

PS; Lookout, most LST-ers are trying to sell you a panterhead. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
UGH. I really don't lknow what to say, how can I ask for bad tattooes? And also I don't really understand what photo-real means.

Can you give me an example what of Biex you didn't like? Just to understand what I'm looking for.

I' am NOT saying that any of them are bad - just not to my taste, and that you should look at more photos than what the artist themselves are advertising with. Photo-real means it looks like a photograph on your skin. People get copies of photos of their children, pets, etc. copied as tattoos, and it often ends up disappointing. I didn't like Biex's photo-real (particularly the dogs and child) but, that may have been what the photo looked like. Also, the text with watch looked way too light to me. But, I'm no expert. Maybe he is the best.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you hoping for something photo realistic or something more avant-garde? If more avant-garde, I'd go with Razvan - he might be able do to something photo realistic for you without the avant-garde marks. There is a great thread on black and grey tattoos somewhere on the forum, and their aging. I highly recommend checking it out for artist references and ideas, thoughts, considerations, opinions, etc... http://www.lastsparrowtattoo.com/forum/general-tattoo-discussion/2654-aging-realism-what-lasts.html Marisa Kakoulas of needlesandsins.com covers a lot of artist from all over the globe, you might want to check her site out for additional ideas.

Another big thing for picking the right artist is that you must go to the shop where the tattoo artist works, and look at their portfolio, feel the vibe of the shop and the staff working there. DO NOT ask for a quote for how much the tattoo would cost whilst visiting. When looking at the tattoo artist's portfolio... do they have nice photos? Are the photos of fresh tattoos, or healed tattoos? Is the portfolio itself decent (as an artist, a poorly photographed portfolio and sloppily put together portfolio sends red flags up for me), does the shop have a good vibe to you? If all is okay for you, then book a consult with your artist. You are not obligated to book a session or place a deposit with a consult (well, some uber busy artists do have consult booking fees that go towards the cost of the tattoo) - with the consult you'll see if you are a good match or not.

A big indicator for me has always been: look at everyone's work, then make a shortlist of whose work you keep returning to look at more and more, then go visit those shops and a few others that didn't make the shortlist. After that, you can go with the tattoo artist's work that feels the most right for you. I spent a lot of time learning what a good tattoo was (placement, linework, shading, etc) just by looking at a lot of tattoos - good, bad, in between - and it made a difference in helping me figure out what kind of tattoo I wanted. I changed subject matter ideas so many times, then I decided to focus on finding a tattoo artist who made my heart pitter-patter, then I worked on sussing out subject matter. It was better for me, but may not be that way for you or others here.

I feel like this response was a big long ramble, sorry about that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Are you hoping for something photo realistic or something more avant-garde? If more avant-garde, I'd go with Razvan - he might be able do to something photo realistic for you without the avant-garde marks. There is a great thread on black and grey tattoos somewhere on the forum, and their aging. I highly recommend checking it out for artist references and ideas, thoughts, considerations, opinions, etc... http://www.lastsparrowtattoo.com/forum/general-tattoo-discussion/2654-aging-realism-what-lasts.html Marisa Kakoulas of needlesandsins.com covers a lot of artist from all over the globe, you might want to check her site out for additional ideas.

Another big thing for picking the right artist is that you must go to the shop where the tattoo artist works, and look at their portfolio, feel the vibe of the shop and the staff working there. DO NOT ask for a quote for how much the tattoo would cost whilst visiting. When looking at the tattoo artist's portfolio... do they have nice photos? Are the photos of fresh tattoos, or healed tattoos? Is the portfolio itself decent (as an artist, a poorly photographed portfolio and sloppily put together portfolio sends red flags up for me), does the shop have a good vibe to you? If all is okay for you, then book a consult with your artist. You are not obligated to book a session or place a deposit with a consult (well, some uber busy artists do have consult booking fees that go towards the cost of the tattoo) - with the consult you'll see if you are a good match or not.

A big indicator for me has always been: look at everyone's work, then make a shortlist of whose work you keep returning to look at more and more, then go visit those shops and a few others that didn't make the shortlist. After that, you can go with the tattoo artist's work that feels the most right for you. I spent a lot of time learning what a good tattoo was (placement, linework, shading, etc) just by looking at a lot of tattoos - good, bad, in between - and it made a difference in helping me figure out what kind of tattoo I wanted. I changed subject matter ideas so many times, then I decided to focus on finding a tattoo artist who made my heart pitter-patter, then I worked on sussing out subject matter. It was better for me, but may not be that way for you or others here.

I feel like this response was a big long ramble, sorry about that.

Actually great answer! I see that you mention placement. Is there such this as a "bad" placement for a tattoo? I was under the impression that it doesn't matter all that much.

I'll follow your advice and see what's what :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is such a thing as bad placement - yes! The tattoo should flow with the body, and look like it was meant to be there (natural, so to speak) vs forced to be there like a sticker. It is important not only for the flow of the body, but how different tattoos will interact with each other. Good placement, again, looks "right" and natural, whereas poor placement looks awkward. When you start looking at more and more tattoos, you'll understand what I mean. It's akin to great composition in a photo, painting or drawing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There is such a thing as bad placement - yes! The tattoo should flow with the body, and look like it was meant to be there (natural, so to speak) vs forced to be there like a sticker. It is important not only for the flow of the body, but how different tattoos will interact with each other. Good placement, again, looks "right" and natural, whereas poor placement looks awkward. When you start looking at more and more tattoos, you'll understand what I mean. It's akin to great composition in a photo, painting or drawing.

Haha. this is beautiful, man! but it gives me great anxiety cause I have no feel for the flow of the body...where do you look at tattoos to get a better feel. most tattooes I see are close up photos and really don't seem to matter where they are, just the actual design..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Haha. this is beautiful, man! but it gives me great anxiety cause I have no feel for the flow of the body...where do you look at tattoos to get a better feel. most tattooes I see are close up photos and really don't seem to matter where they are, just the actual design..

The best way to do this is to see tattoos in person. I would recommend going to the tattoo convention you mentioned above to see tattoos in real life. You'll learn a lot more that way because, like you said, most pictures of tattoos are just pictures of tattoos and don't give much information about flow and placement. Seeing tattoos in real life is also going to help you to find out what you like because you'll see them healed and aged and you'll again get a much better idea of what they look like than you would just from pictures.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The best way to do this is to see tattoos in person. I would recommend going to the tattoo convention you mentioned above to see tattoos in real life. You'll learn a lot more that way because, like you said, most pictures of tattoos are just pictures of tattoos and don't give much information about flow and placement. Seeing tattoos in real life is also going to help you to find out what you like because you'll see them healed and aged and you'll again get a much better idea of what they look like than you would just from pictures.

Makes a lot of sense. I'll sure try to go to that convention!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The best way to do this is to see tattoos in person. I would recommend going to the tattoo convention you mentioned above to see tattoos in real life. You'll learn a lot more that way because, like you said, most pictures of tattoos are just pictures of tattoos and don't give much information about flow and placement. Seeing tattoos in real life is also going to help you to find out what you like because you'll see them healed and aged and you'll again get a much better idea of what they look like than you would just from pictures.

This is exactly how I meet the artist that is working on my leg right now. I knew what I wanted so I had my eye out for the style on the last expo I went.

Its definitely the best way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I will second the motion to go to a convention. Artists, understandably, put together a portfolio of only their best work, just like plastic surgeons, lol, so you're only going to see the stuff they are MOST proud of, in most cases.

For me, I spent a lot of time looking at good tattoos, and even looking at sites that showcase really BAD tattoos so I could get an understanding of the range of styles and techniques, and I began to have a very specific eye for what I wanted and what I knew would work for me.

All that browsing really helped me know what I wanted, which in turn helps the artist help YOU get what you want.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I will second the motion to go to a convention. Artists, understandably, put together a portfolio of only their best work, just like plastic surgeons, lol, so you're only going to see the stuff they are MOST proud of, in most cases.

For me, I spent a lot of time looking at good tattoos, and even looking at sites that showcase really BAD tattoos so I could get an understanding of the range of styles and techniques, and I began to have a very specific eye for what I wanted and what I knew would work for me.

All that browsing really helped me know what I wanted, which in turn helps the artist help YOU get what you want.

What sites do you recommend?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll add another perspective for you to consider when choosing an artist. Technical ability, and individual style are very important factors. There are so many good artists out there right now, there is no shortage of talent and technical skill.

But, don't discount your own personal chemistry with said artist. Depending on if you plan on getting more tattoos from the same artist, it can be equally important to develop a good relationship with a talented artist - it has a huge impact on your tattoo experience.

A good artist with whom you get along with can eliminate most pre-tattoo anxiety. They can provide answers that you know are trustworthy. They may spend extra time on designing your tattoos, or brainstorm really cool ideas with you. And then get excited about tattooing those ideas, which always turn out to be the best tattoos. They may cut you a break on their normal rates, or get you priority booking. There are countless little things that an artist who trusts YOU, as a client, can do to make the whole experience that much more awesome.

Not saying that there aren't a ton of artists who don't already do all that because they are that cool/professional to begin with. But, having a good working relationship with an artist can make things so much easier.

So, in summary - find someone who not only does good work. But, just as a piece of personal advice, find someone who you could see hanging out with if they weren't your tattoo artist - it makes a difference.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now