Kev

Tattoo silhouette and negative space

Recommended Posts

Yep those legs have impact. I've seen them a few times in person and still last year at the SF convention when I saw Him with his pants off I had to drop what I was doing and run over to get another look

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Saw this on FB, thought, "Oh man, that's one of THE LEGS!" Then thought of LST and about posting it. Then thought, "Eh, I bet Iwar will post it." YOU'RE PREDICTABLE IWAR

Haha! I guess I am.

I bet that dude is going to be a little creeped out if he finds this thread and see so many people obsessing over his legs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Folks:

I am starting a leg sleeve (s) with Stuart Cripwell. I am getting tattoo about once about every other week and you can see what we have done so far below. For the first few pieces, I just picked stuff I liked and had it tattooed in spots I thought would fit my body well. Now, I still pick out the piece but Stuart outlines the negative space [ex: the empty slot of skin between two tattoos] on tracing paper. He then draws the piece, adding and taking away, so that it fits in the outline.

Best, Dellwood

P.S. I am in the market for good set of kneecap tattoos ideas. I know there is a thread on this but was hoping for some more suggestions taking into consideration negative space, traditional style tattoos. I have been looking at Spider Webb's books of traditional American body suits and the knees are always hard to make out. From what I can see, though, it seems like suns, nautical stars/hexes, spider webs, and elephant heads were pretty common.

dsc05265_thumb.jpg dsc05251_thumb.jpg dsc05254_thumb.jpg dsc05279_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love this picture above, its a perfect example for this conversation. Not only does the arm with no filer look stronger now but you can tell that the negative space is going to give those tattoos room to grow over time and not blur right into each other. I will be using this photo as an example to future clients who want smaller traditional pieces on why background isn't necessarily needed to make a sleeve look complete and finished. And that stomach piece is insane, so simple and so strong, love it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am on the fence about whether or not to fill in negative space in a traditional American sleeve or set of tattoos. I love those Cripwell legs, but I also love stars and dots as filler. Also, little tiny daggers, flowers, hearts, eagles, etc. work really well as filler. I'd like to know what y'all think about large scale Japanese work and backgrounds/filler, though. Personally, I think Japanese work needs a background to look its absolute best. Still a tough decision. Some examples:

Not sure who the tattooer is on these two (any help would be appreciated):

tumblr_m5miha1R4p1qjev70o1_400.png

tumblr_m4eedh8rpW1rr9uvzo1_500.jpg

vs

Horiharu:

tumblr_m5lq1pXFRl1qll54do1_400.jpg

Horitoshi I:

tumblr_m5g2qrYeF21qll54do1_500.jpg

Horiyoshi III:

tumblr_m66s56rtxp1rr9uvzo1_1280.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I thought this belonged here as a great example of negative space. I also like how one arm has the star and dot filler vs. the other non filled. I think the non-filled arm is much stronger:

tumblr_lzs9ujoyZI1qbxi45o1_r1_1280.jpg

I think his right arm has too many stars and dots. I would have gotten more small tattoos and did just a few stars and dots to tie it together. Pretty good collection nonetheless.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I thought this belonged here as a great example of negative space. I also like how one arm has the star and dot filler vs. the other non filled. I think the non-filled arm is much stronger:

tumblr_lzs9ujoyZI1qbxi45o1_r1_1280.jpg

Figured out Krooked Ken did the belly rocker- not sure on the rest.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was just looking at the new Zeis book the other day and was just thinking how a sleeve would look with traditional tattoos overlapping, almost as if you had the perfect amount of negative space to let different tattoos peek out from behind the foreground ones.. I don't know if I'm explaining it right, good examples out of the book would be the Hundahl crying babies one or the jeremy joachim one.. Although you would really have to have a seperation there, one as traditional warm colors, and the other some cool grayline or vice versa.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry to drag up an old thread (not sure if that's bad form, but I don't believe I'm able to start new ones yet) -- I just had a little question that relates to this.

At some point soon, I'll be getting my third tattoo on the back/top of my shoulder, possibly onto my upper arm. It's gonna be a reworked design of the concept in the illustration below. It's possible that afterward, I'll get brave enough to head down my arm with some other nautical-themed stuff (other ship/shipwrecked stuff, an octopus, a mermaid), but I would want them to be "stand-alone" pieces, like the left arm of that guy in the image that @Kev posted up there ^^ (i.e., no filler, just negative space around them).

So my question is, if I don't want an entire integrated sleeve, is it necessary to talk through the possibilities for my entire arm with my artist before I get this first one at the top of my shoulder/back done? Or can I just go for it, and figure out what fits where for the rest later?

I don't want to overthink it since it's possible I won't get a bunch more after all, but I also want to make sure I have at least thought ahead a little if I do decide to keep going.

Sorry for the rambling, and thanks in advance for your thoughts!

871971242545508.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Keepcalm,

I wouldn't worry too much about the planning right now. The beauty of old-school designs is the you can just "stamp" them on and have a great sleeve. My sleeve came together from a bunch of bigger and smaller tattoos placed a bit haphazardly. I had ideas of what I liked, but was open to getting classic designs that filled the spaces I had to work with. An arm has a lot more space than you might think!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey, thanks @mtlsam! I figured that was probably the case, but I'm not super savvy in the tattoo world yet so I'm never sure what's "typical." Only time will tell if I get brave up to "use up" more of that arm real estate! :) If I do, I know I'll want more straightforward designs in black and gray, so hopefully they would all meld together/harmonize with no problem.

Thanks again for the reply!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to admit after looking at the above image I am really leaning towards filling out my arms with this... have some text , feathers, and a koi (not overly Asian) that could be worked into the over all design....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




  • Posts

    • It's not NYC...it's flying!
    • Welcome!  In these times (and I don't mean Covid related times) it's pretty common to have to wait and patiently pursue the artist of your dreams - assuming you're stuck on just one artist. I actually waited almost 2 years to get to sit down in front of a particularly busy guy. Throwing down extra cash might work with some and piss off others. Working with personalities is always a gamble . . .  What style of tattoo are you desiring? $1000 will buy you traveling options . . . 
    • I am ready!  Really just focused on design and finding the right artist... seems like the best ones that focus on the style I like all have their books closed.  I would happily pay a premium fee to use one of these artists... considering the fact that this thing will be on my body for rest of my life, something like a $1k "bonus" to the artist seems like a no brainer to find the most talented.  Any ideas how to broach that subject?
  • Last Sparrow Tattoo Sponsors

  • Topics

  • Blog Entries