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vm_md

Hello/Introduction + Use of dextrometorphan (DXM) to avoid tattoo pain

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Posted (edited)

Hi All,

As an introduction, I am a 28yo Belgian male and I got a huge full back tattoo (with many big black areas) in multiple sessions since last summer.

The first session was extremely painful. Let's not discuss the general concept of pain during getting a tattoo since this depends on many factors and is very personal. Let's discuss possible solutions though since I am sure many persons are searching for this.

After the first session I first consulted with a dermatologist. He recommended the EMLA cream to be applied on the zone to be tattooed before/during the process. Even though many tattoo artists disagree I tried it once and was very unsatisfied with the result. I felt little to no difference.

Idem with OTC pain killers.

Even though I was not a drug user at all, at this point I was open to almost anything to surpress the pain.

After some research I came across Dextrometorphan (DXM), which in low doses is a cough repressant but in higher off-label doses becomes a potentially potent dissociative drug. DXM is OTC prescription free medication is most jurisdictions including USA and most if not all European countries, so it is easy to get and is not illegal.

To learn more about it read the FAQ on Erowid which imo is the best and most complete source about safely abusing 😉 DXM (I am IN NO WAY related to Erowid). I just want to share here how it helped me to surpress the pain during the tattoo process. DO READ that FAQ before using it though, for your own good !!!

At first I obviously tried it at home in different dosages (start low !!!). During my first "trips" I had some dissociative experiences, mild hallucinations, and sensation of pain indeed seemed reduced.
I was aware 100% of the time that whatever I felt was due to taking this product.

The first sessions teached me that it would be safe to use it during the tattoo sessions since I managed to act normal enough while "high" on it. It doesn't make you act more active, to the contrary. When taking it at home it mostly make you lay or sit down, which is exactly all you need to do while getting a tattoo.

At first I took 375mg of DXM during a session and for sure did feel way less pain (it still hurt a lot but DXM undoubtedly had a very positive effect). In later sessions I took up to 750mg, sometimes with redosing with a further 375mg later during the session. Obviously always after having tried whatever dose I took during the session before at home !!!
It was a great help to me ... The sensation of pain is clearly decreased and even though you feel it, it seems to be dissociated to a certain effect (in the sense that it doesn't really seem to apply as it would normally do).
In all cases I managed to act reasonably normal during the sessions. Only "signs" were dilated pupils, being less socialable as normal (partly because saying coherent things becomes more difficult, even though I was lucid enough to not act too weird), and maybe walking a bit in a slightly fucked up way ...
Either way I am sure the tattoo artist would have declined tattooing me if she noticed.

Hopefully my experience can help some of you.
Be wise though and use your common sense ! INFORM yourself before taking anything.

Make sure to only consume PURE dextrometorphan. NEVER use a product which also contains other active substances. Research this online. This obviously depends on what is available in your country.
Always try it first at home, starting with low doses and gradually increasing when the previous "trip" went well, and decide based on your experiences at home whether it is a good idea for you to take during getting tattoed.

Good luck to all and I am very curious to hear similar experiences from other inked persons 😉

VM

Edited by vm_md

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I think it's dangerous to mess with drugs like this unsolicited, unguided. Especially with your tattoo artist NOT knowing? You don't know what you don't from a medical point of view. 

It is foolish to open oneself to unknown and unforeseen risks experimenting with drugs like this, and all to avoid tattoo pain. 

I hope this post does not encourage other ppl to experiment with drugs like this all just for avoiding. 

However we are adults so we can do what we want! 

But to answer, I don't look to avoid pain. Tattoos hurt for me and I just sit till I can. 

Don't get me wrong, nothing wrong with using numbing creams but this seems to be another level. 

I am sorry my post is not supportive. I am just more concerned more than anything. 

 

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23 minutes ago, ChoWai said:

Don't get me wrong, nothing wrong with using numbing creams but this seems to be another level. 

How are numbing creams any different? You still didn't 'earn' your tattoo.

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@Hogrider He is using DMX in OFF LABEL doses. 

Does not sound like a thing a regular tattoo artist would know about.

It is not in conjunction with a doctor. 

He is experimenting with dosage amounts - he does not mention any instructions the DMX comes with. 

You could get yourself hooked onto painkillers this way.

His tattooist DID NOT KNOW and would have declined if she knew. 

This is what is irresponsible/dangerous. 

I hope you can see how this is very different to buying a household, bottled cream over the counter, complete with instructions which many other ppl have used over the years AND tattoo artist knows. 

 

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@Hogrider This is where we disagree. You are way more tattooed than me but I still have 150+ hours of needle time, so I feel like my perspective is at least educated. I think there is a time and place for numbing creams. If tattoos always hurt you and you can't stand it, then maybe tattoos aren't for you. If you always rely on something to kill the pain, that's not what I am saying is a use case, IMO.

However, in situations where someone has traveled to get a tattoo in a multi-hour session, and the pain becomes unbearable, then why not? What if the artist suggests it? Some tattoos just hurt more than others, too. If the artist is okay with it, numbing allows him to do his work, and the client is obviously in extreme pain, why not?

 

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On January 13, 2019 at 9:15 AM, Gingerninja said:

@Hogrider This is where we disagree. You are way more tattooed than me but I still have 150+ hours of needle time, so I feel like my perspective is at least educated. I think there is a time and place for numbing creams. If tattoos always hurt you and you can't stand it, then maybe tattoos aren't for you. If you always rely on something to kill the pain, that's not what I am saying is a use case, IMO.

However, in situations where someone has traveled to get a tattoo in a multi-hour session, and the pain becomes unbearable, then why not? What if the artist suggests it? Some tattoos just hurt more than others, too. If the artist is okay with it, numbing allows him to do his work, and the client is obviously in extreme pain, why not?

 

Well, these are opinions, so I don't have a problem with people who disagree with me. However, you point out a good exception to the numbing cream rule, for me anyway. I'm really talking about someone that comes in for their first dime size tattoo on their bicep and cries like a baby. 

To me it's the difference between some dilettante getting a tattoo because it's trendy, but doesn't want any discomfort and someone who respects the tradition. With 150+ hours in the chair, you've certainly proved that you respect the tradition, although the only one anyone needs to prove or justify anything to is themselves.

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On January 12, 2019 at 6:22 PM, ChoWai said:

@Hogrider He is using DMX in OFF LABEL doses. 

Does not sound like a thing a regular tattoo artist would know about.

It is not in conjunction with a doctor. 

He is experimenting with dosage amounts - he does not mention any instructions the DMX comes with. 

You could get yourself hooked onto painkillers this way.

His tattooist DID NOT KNOW and would have declined if she knew. 

This is what is irresponsible/dangerous. 

I hope you can see how this is very different to buying a household, bottled cream over the counter, complete with instructions which many other ppl have used over the years AND tattoo artist knows. 

 

Blocking the pain is blocking the pain. It's just my opinion, my rules aren't binding on anyone but myself. :91_thumbsup:

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If you want to get f*cked up, take the drugs and get f*cked up.

If you want to get tattooed, get tattooed.

Pain is part of the rite of passage of tattooing.

I believe is being lost because of how accessible everything is now.

Take a swig of navy rum, bite down on a leather belt and take it like a champ. 

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23 hours ago, Hogrider said:

Blocking the pain is blocking the pain. It's just my opinion, my rules aren't binding on anyone but myself. :91_thumbsup:

@Hogrider I'm afraid you've read into my posts wrong or I wasn't clear enough. 

I am not discussing whether or not someone has earned their tattoo.

The difference I was outlining between established numbing creams vs DMX was the safety assurance in use of the former vs the later.

Otherwise I agree, numbing is numbing whichever way you achieve it!  

 

Edited by ChoWai

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