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  1. Doing some redecorating, want these to go to a good home. Both were bought directly from Grez in '08. Both come with the frames that they're in. Vulture and skull. Marked as number 44/100. $300 US shipped. Paypal only - gift or add 3.5%. Snake and Skull. Marked as number 23/100. $300 US shipped. Paypal only - gift or add 3.5%. Let me know, thanks!
  2. Hello everyone! I have spare copies of the first and second Sailor Jerry Tattoo Flash books. Both are in very good - excellent condition, just a bit of bending at the corners. Volume 1 - $200 shipped Volume 2 - $165 shipped PM with any questions. Make me an offer. The worst I can say is no.
  3. Right, no entitlement because you're willing to pay. But, if he doesn't want to work on it further, then fuck 'em, right? How dare he not cater endlessly to the consumer.
  4. Seems to me like the person "working for profit" that "must need make their art into what the customer wishes" in this case has already done so. If I understood the op, then the reason he dislikes the tattoo now is that he finds the subject matter disagreeable, or not "tuff" enough, or whatever. The problem isn't a poorly designed or executed tattoo. Don't get me wrong: I fully believe that the customer should get exactly the tattoo they want. In this case, the client DID get the tattoo he wanted, and later decided for some reason that he did want it anymore. Ask the artist if he'll alter it, but don't be surprised if he's less than enthusiastic. Just because the client paid, or is paying, for it doesn't mean the artist is forever on the hook, and should be expected to alter or change existing work with no personal feelings on the matter. And if you don't like his answer, then fuck you. Take that entitlement shit down the road. Disclaimer: this is just the viewpoint of one inexperienced tattoo artist. Others may and inevitably will differ. Speaking plainly, I did not appreciate the tone of the above post.
  5. When I was an apprentice, we had a lot of people coming in to ask for apprenticeships (of course). One night, a pretty nice looking girl comes in, and does the typcial dance: first asks to see books, walks around the shop for a bit, and then starts up a conversation with me about apprenticeships. I tried to steer her as well as I could; she had no visible tattoos, and only had a few poorly executed script and rose drawings to show anyone. First bit of advice I gave - get tattooed. A lot. Not only does it show that you're a committed participant in the tattoo world, but it will also allow you to build relationships with good artists that can possibly help you when the time is right for you to move into an apprenticeship. Next bit of advice: start copying flash. It went on from there, but she made a point to say how she felt like she shouldn't have to be "tattooed up" to be a tattoo artist, and how some shit-bag local artist (who also was very lightly tattooed) had agreed with her when they talked about it (no secret what that was about), and how they both hated the thought of being judged for having tattoos. When I told her that our shop wasn't accepting any apprenticeships at that time, she finished up by saying how some busy street shop owner in Garland, TX had offered to let her apprentice for a pretty sizable fee, and that she someday hoped to have an "LA Ink style" shop staffed completely by "hot tattoo chicks". I couldn't get her out the door quickly enough. If they don't have tattoos, then fuck 'em.
  6. Elbow ditch for me, too. Not just the ditch, but all along the upper part of that area where my skin folds as I bend my arm. Shit healed roughly. Top of the feet were bad too, but mainly because I got both tattooed about 4 days apart, in a foreign country where I had to walk everywhere, in winter. Socks and swollen feet make for rough tattoo healing.
  7. Netflix + Hulu plus. around $20 a month, and I can watch most of the shows I want to keep up with that are on cable. That, plus cable internet, is around $80/month, when I was paying $170 or so. Fuck that shit.
  8. That's a great tattoo. I have to echo the sentiments above: wait. I suspect that you'll come back around and start to see it for what it is: a great way to commemorate a special friend who's now gone. You can be damn sure that I'll be commemorating my pups when the unthinkable happens (doesn't even bear thinking about). Sorry for your loss. Also, I won't speak for Eli Quinters, but I'll say that if I spent time designing and applying a tattoo that rad, and was then asked to change it significantly or cover it up (and felt that it could be done, which is not always the case), I may decide to oblige depending on who was asking, but it would bum me out. Just saying.
  9. I went in with a basic idea of what I wanted, spoke to an artist, and initially decided on a 1/2 sleeve, which became a 3/4 sleeve. On the day of my first appointment, we bumped it up to a full sleeve, and I was off and away. Tattoo artist magic.
  10. I live in a pretty conservative town, so I get stares fairly often. For some reason, it just doesn't bother me anymore. I used to get irritated whenever I realized someone was staring at me, but I just ignore it now. I realize that I've committed to something that will be visible on my body for the rest of my life, so I understand when people look. Also, I'm from the mid-west: I'm used to brushing people off for being close-minded.
  11. They look great, not that I'm surprised. He's an incredible artist, and was an amazing mentor. Can't overstate how lucky I was to learn from him.
  12. I used to, but I moved up to Tulsa about a year ago. What did you have him do for you?
  13. I have extra copies of vol. 1 and 2 that I'd be willing to sell. PM me.
  14. Hi everyone, My name is Bob, and I'm a tattooer from Oklahoma. I apprenticed with David Bruehl during his time at Think Ink Tattoos in Norman, OK (he has since moved to Red Letter 1 in Tampa, FL). Due to some life circumstances, I'm working a joe-job at the moment, but am hoping to get back into the swing of things soon. Thanks!