ksp2001

Laser Away Opinions/Advice on my tattoo

11 posts in this topic

Greetings. Here is my unfinished arm; that I’ve just started loosing interest in. Some days I want to finish it, other days I can’t stand it and want to laser it and start new. I’m at a lost and thought I’d just ask others for some advice/opinions. Thanks.

Edited by ksp2001
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What would be required to finish it? It looks like it may have started as a simple arm tattoo that was converted to a sleeve perhaps?

To remove it, you're looking at probably 12+ sessions due to the colors, possibly more if they split it up into 2 parts, upper / lower, to ensure you can properly heal it all. Probably a 2 year investment.

How's your relationship with your artist? Do you like their work, are you happy with what they've done so far? Often times, the best work you'll get from an artist is when you let them finish it the way they want to, because it gives them a little more freedom to create and work.

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@mikePanic Thanks, helpful info regarding removal sessions. It did start as a few simple tattoos that I tought I’d tie together. Originally, I planned to have blue shading done in between the spaces and around everything, similar to what’s up on the top of my arm. Kinda of a space theme. I just think my arms is too hot (colorful) and I'm not the person I was when I got the spirals done.

I’m on good terms with the artist, I’m just not really thinking I want to finish it the way I planned. I’ve been thinking of changing it to this. Keeping the space theme but going more realistic. Down my arm would go another cat and some abstract space. I think I'd only need to do a few laser sessions to remove some colors and a cleaner working area.

@jayessebee it's funny you mention a panther because I would like to add some big cats onto the arm.

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The reason they say "big" cats, is to cover is a falsehood, you're actually attempting to hide the original tattoos with one over it. Cover ups, by nature, tend to be very large in comparison to the original piece and very dark. That said, because so much of your "add a sleeve" tattoo is light in color, going over it with something like a tiger or other big cat should be pretty straight forward.

The part where you're in luck is that black / red are the fastest to be removed from laser treatment, so the three circular pieces, which is where I'm guessing you started originally, would most likely be the only ones your artist may suggest you lighten. All the factors aside, 3-6 treatments should be more than enough to give your artist a better starting point. Before you go forward though, talk with the artist, have them start sketching out what you want based on placement, and see what they suggest you do or don't get lightened in order to facilitate the piece you really want. From that point, you may be able to work the filler material for around the big cats.

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The part where you're in luck is that black / red are the fastest to be removed from laser treatment, so the three circular pieces, which is where I'm guessing you started originally, would most likely be the only ones your artist may suggest you lighten.

That's great. Thanks for the advice, it's very helpful. I guess I should be thankful I chose lighter colors. I'm a little confused however...if I'm in luck and Black and red are removed the fastest. Wouldn't that mean I would need more laser sessions to remove the yellow and blue. If need be?

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if I'm in luck and Black and red are removed the fastest. Wouldn't that mean I would need more laser sessions to remove the yellow and blue. If need be?

Correct, yellow and blue do take longer / more treatments, however because they are so light, it's probably going to be easier, cheaper and faster if you're artist just covers them up with new ink, if that makes sense.

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Subjecting the tattoo to surgery such that the skin containing it is removed and the rest is sewn together is another widely opted procedure.

- - - Updated - - -

Certain cosmetic tattoos, such as pink, white and flesh-colored lip liners, may darken immediately with laser therapy. This effect can usually be corrected with further treatment. If immediate skin darkening is a concern, the laser should be tested on a small spot first.

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