Bart Bingham

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About Bart Bingham

  • Rank
    Regular

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  • Location
    New York , NY
  • Occupation
    tattooer
  1. "So if you run into someone who asks to see packages opened, it isn't because they don't trust you" it's exactly because they don't trust us. As i said in my previous statement I have absolutely no issue with opening packages in front of folks, its not a big deal and while i dont get butthurt i do feel a tad insulted by the request ONLY because i know almost undoubtedly that that person asking me has never asked a doctor or nurse or dentist or even acupucturist to do the same because they view those individuals as professionals they can trust while we're just a bunch of filthy bikers. you make a good point about the stricter certs for those folks but really that isnt whats going through most peoples minds when the ask to watch a setup.the exception to that being people who work in the medical field. what is going through the average non medical field persons mind is based purely on our looks and on preconceived notions that we're mostly a bunch of dirty bikers. I worked in 2 of the busiest ERs in the country for 6 years and in that time i've seen plenty of nurses, doctors, phlebotomist etc., etc cross contaminate and break the sterile chain regardless of all that certification. sometimes out of laziness but mostly out of just plain ole absent mindedness i think folks SHOULD be asking to see packages opened. my problem isnt that they ask me, its that they ask ONLY me. i cant speak for every state but the last three states ive worked in including NY where i am now have all required me/all tattooers to be individually licensed as well as pass a test demonstrating basic knowledge of universal precautions/bloodborne pathogens. side note : a large part of why i personally prefer clients not see me setup is that i worked hard to learn this craft and get every little nugget of info that i could. setting up a tattoo machine for optimal performance and efficiency is not common knowledge and so i don want to give trade secrets out to every aspiring tattoo artist that comes in the door any more that KFC wants us to know what their 11 herbs and spices are. with that being said i do get where youre coming from and respect your side of the debate.
  2. I read an article in I cant remember what magazine many years ago that pointed out that almost every question we get asked about our tattoos can also be directed towards a new teen mother example: "did that hurt?" "what do your parents think about that?" " you know you're stuck with that for ever, right?" "i cant believe you'd do that to your body?" "why would you do something so irresponsible?" etc., etc.
  3. I just had some major dental work done a couple of weeks ago. As a result i had various instruments all up in my mouth. Because he's a professional i didn't ask or even think to ask my dentist to prove to me that he ran a clean operation, nor did i lose any sleep over it later. I worked in an ER for 6 years and in that time I never witnessed a single person ask to see proof that the syringe, tongue depressor, speculum, scalpel or sutures etc. etc. were new or ask to see it being removed from the package.likewise, I'd bet the farm you have never asked a dentist or doctor to prove they're using clean instruments either. to answer the OG question; Much like a doctor is only allowed to use a scalpel blade once we are only allowed to use a needle once and just as the doctor has no legal obligation to open the blade in front of you nor do tattooers have a legal obligation to do so. that being said, i will gladly and without hesitation open and assemble any and all tools in front of anyone who asks if it makes them feel better and more at ease. I'll do it with a smile on my face AND i wont even mention that when they said "i need to see you open the needle in front of me" what i really heard was " hey, you're a heavily tattooed person and therefore i assume that you're most likely a dirt bag that i cant possibly view as being a professional with ethics so i need for you to open that needle in front of me although i would never ask that of my dentist because i would feel like i was insulting him/her"
  4. my advice is draw more from life and less from tattoo flash. example: It's a lot easier to draw a good traditional tattoo style eagle if you understand the anatomy of an actual eagle as opposed to if you try to draw one based on someone elses already skewed anatomy.
  5. I see a couple of people suggesting that its a bad idea to go the freehand route. sorry but that is false. if you go to someone and they cant draw a good design on you chances are that they wouldn't have drawn it any better on paper. I am not saying they don't use stencils and I'm sure they do sometimes but I personally have never seen Richard Stell, Troy Denning or Chris Trevino use a stencil. also I work with both Horizakura and Yoni Zilber who I watch draw on entire sleeves and backpieces that become the most beautifuly executed tattoos. So what im saying is its not the process/approach that is to blame for giving you an unsatisfactory tattoo it is the artist that executed it. I'd hate to see you go into a situation where youre gonna get tattooed by a Chris Garver or Horitomo and he says he's gonna freehand it so you get spooked and end up opting out of it because someone on the internet said that freehand is a red flag. also drawing on the spot is perfectly ok if the artist has the experience and skills to do so. if Gordon Ramsey offered to come to my house and make me dinner using whatever i have in my cupboard I'm not going to request that he figure out the recipe a week in advance because he's going to nail it.
  6. Darcy Nutt at Chalice in Boise Eric Payne at Ink Vision in Boise Matt Arriola is from Boise and does guest spots at Ink vision sometimes I did a guest spot in Boise at darcy's place a little while ago. It's a great little town in my opinion.
  7. Hey Dan, you'll see first hand what a good shop assistant is and what to look for when you come out to work with us this spring as the shop guys at our shop really are great.
  8. Chris Trevino does great skull tattoos. Daniel Albrigo does a lot of great skull tattoos too. as does a gazillion other tattooers i can think of
  9. hey Bill, I second that opinion. Jason comes to NYC to work with us at NYadorned for a few days every month. great guy and great tattoos.
  10. Jesus

  11. I agree with dave. Yoni would do an incredible job on that. Brooklyn adorned however has closed its doors permanently and he is back in manhattan at NY Adorned now.
  12. you sure it's not Junii? I've not seen Junii's whole back but i have seen her shoulders once when she was wearing a sleeveless shirt and what i saw was identical to that 1st picture
  13. well actually it is "little to no tattoos" so forget number 2 . but still... saving a spot or two for the future is fine but not getting tattooed not at all or almost not at all because you might not like it later...well... that is part of the attraction of tattoos. the permanence. not getting tattooed because you might not like it later is like choosing to not date someone who's totally awesome and perfect for you because you might grow apart and meet someone better in 15 years. there's no way to know.
  14. i did this fun one just the other day
  15. 1) while those tattoos do not reflect who i am any more i do not regret any of them. they reflect who i was and where i came from artistically and i remember everything i learned from every one of them. i learned more about tattooing from getting tattooed by good tattooers than from anything else. i do wish i had room for more tattoos however. but not because i regret what i have but because i love tattoos and as i said previously "people who are into tattoos get tattoos" and that desire doesnt go away when you run out of room. 2)this isnt a discussion about saving a spot or two for future tattoos its about not having any tattoos.