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yourfutureartist

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About yourfutureartist

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  1. I rely on only my very best and favorite of clients to fill those sorts of spots. My guys manage their own cancellation lists, and I can also say I strongly support a blacklist. If someone no calls no shows once we have to talk about etiquette. If it happens again I charge an additional non refundable deposit, any more than that and I wont tattoo the client. It isn't fair to waste peoples time...I think clients shrug if off like it is no big deal. But it is a big deal, if I can at least get a heads up perhaps I can fill a slot with another client or maybe grab a walk in.
  2. I complained once to a buddy about this chicks stinky feet.....we were all friends and he must have said something because next time she came in she was sure not only to get a pedicure but to let me know she got a pedicure because she didn't want me having to smell her stinky feet. Classic. I still tattoo her to this day, super rad chick never a stinky since. Some of the people we deal with they obviously don't care about their overall hygiene or their disheveled appearance. But hey, it comes with the territory, we deal with all kind of folks from all walks of life.
  3. Anything your doing to prematurely age your skin is going to do the same to your tattoos. Once heavily tattooed there is no better substitute for protection than a long sleeved t-shirt. I keep one handy at work, in my truck, my bag if I go on my motorcycle. I am that guy on the beach wearing a long sleeve, I look ridiculous but hey its a lot of time to invest to just throw it away for some sun. Before I started to tattoo an artist and now good friend used to get mad at me if I showed up at the shop without wearing long sleeve protection.....but we also live in PHX.
  4. No one can really give you the best advice as they do not know the artist and or the caliber of his or her work. In my experience infections occur nine times out of ten from customers. If you are new to the tattoo world take extra care following your artists instructions on aftercare. Don't rush to pin it on the artist however you can also observe an artists habits as he or she works.....generally being a clean freak is a plus. Lastly don't sell yourself short...this is your body we are talking about here decorate it the best way you possibly can. If you have doubts seek out someone you li
  5. too many to choose from they are all rad and I would be happy to have a tattoo from any one of those guys, can't wait to get out there next summer
  6. It couldn't possibly matter if you had done the tattoo a thousand times this year alone and shared that same information with a client.....they still can find a way to make it acceptable for them to have this same image. I can understand wanting a small tattoo to get your feet wet, to see what it is all about before committing to large scale work but why would you want such a foolish thoughtless image? People seem so afraid of flash, yet these timeless designs get passed up for the latest pintrest favorites. I'll keep encouraging my clients to use thought and open their eyes to the possibi
  7. Agenda for day off: Deposit loot. Draw tattoos. Share some loot with LST. Thanks you guys you rock
  8. People are too lazy to work they have to take from those of us working hard. Any luck recovering any of this stolen property? Keep your head up Dan, karma has a way of working things out.
  9. Not every piece you do is one you will be super excited about. But just because the piece might not be your particular favorite does not change the fact that every client deserves the best possible tattoo you can give them. I find that if I have a piece I am not thrilled about I get feedback from my staff and brainstorm as to how I can do something different with the tattoo while still meeting the guidelines my client has given me. If I do some homework generally I can find a way to make the design something I can get excited about. If an artist truly does not want to do the tattoo then pe
  10. I have to agree that although it is less visible on the back that there is a stigma none the less with visible tattoos. If you have any doubt in your mind you should avoid anything you can not cover. Professionalism in the workplace is an important part of success in any career field and some career fields offer great opportunities regardless of your tattoos. However, many people change careers. If there is any possibility that you may get stuck on the career ladder as a result of a tattoo perhaps you should be cautious with your choice of placement. There is something to be said for bein
  11. Just wanted to introduce myself, my name is Aaron. I have been tattooing five years after completing a two year apprenticeship that began in 2005. I spent nearly six years of networking to get my opportunity to join this great trade. Tattooing has consumed my life and I am grateful to have it. There is a lot of great interview material on this site and I must commend Scott Sylvia and his tream creating such a great blog. Regardless of how myself or anyone else feels about the internet and technology and its impact on the trade I think this site offers a lot of positive information for art
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