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Perseverance - Japanese Tattoo Tradition in the Modern World

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Was just pokin' around the internet and saw this on Yellow Blaze Tattoo's site. What a lineup!!

I poked around the forums to see if anyone else had posted this yet, couldn't find any references but may have missed something. Apologies if there is any redundancy!

http://www.facebook.com/JANMTattooShow

PERSEVERANCE – JAPANESE TATTOO TRADITION IN A MODERN WORLD

THE JAPANESE AMERICAN NATIONAL MUSEUM

MARCH 8 – SEPTEMBER 14, 2014

EXHIBITION BY KIP FULBECK / CURATED BY TAKAHIRO KITAMURA

The Japanese American National Museum (JANM) proudly presents PERSEVERANCE –Japanese Tattoo Tradition in a Modern World, a photographic exhibition exploring the artistry and master craftsmanship of traditional Japanese tattooing.

Revered as an art form worldwide for centuries, The Japanese Tattoo has a long and tumultuous history with the country of its origin. Tattooing and tattooed individuals have been persecuted and stigmatized throughout Japan – including prohibitions on public display, work requirements specifying tattoo coverage (or the complete absence of tattoos), even the outlawing of the practice itself. Many of these bans are still in effect today.

Despite this negative public pressure and government repression, the Japanese Tattoo tradition has not only persevered, it has thrived. Now practiced in various forms throughout the world, traditional Japanese Tattooing is internationally renowned for its artistry, lineage, historical symbolism, and skill. PERSEVERANCE will investigate and showcase the breathtaking artistry of the Japanese Tattoo through the works of over 30 of the world’s leading contemporary tattoo artists.

The work of seven internationally acclaimed Japanese tattooers will be specially featured via life-sized photographs by artist Kip Fulbeck. Utilizing the state of the art Phase One camera system, these stunning photographs capture the intricacies and flow of the Japanese Tattoo “body suit” with striking detail and clarity. Featuring Chris Brand, Horitaka, Horitomo, Miyazo, Shige, Junko Shimada, and Yokohama Horiken.

Also showing Don Ed Hardy, Colin Horisou Baker, Stan Corona, Espi, Chris Garver, Jeff Gogue, Regino Gonzales, Jill Horiyuki Halpin, Tim Hendricks, Horikazu 4, Horikiku, Horitoshi Family Horizakura, Timothy Hoyer, Jakoh, Henning Jorgensen, Brian Kaneko, Robert Klem, Chad Koeplinger, Adrian Lee, L.A. Horitaka, Lil' Tokyo Jiro, Sulu'ape Steve Looney, Chris O'Donnell, Chuey Quintanar, Kahlil Rintye, Stewart Robson, Mike Rubendall, Evan Skrederstu, Small Paul, Luke Stewart, The Grime, Tomo, Dan Wysuph

SPECIAL EXHIBITION FEATURES

The exhibition opening features keynote speakers, book signings, and live tattooing by Chris Brand, Horitaka, Horitomo, Miyazo, Shige, Junko Shimada, and Yokohama Horiken. Monthly live tattoo demonstrations by L.A. Horitaka, Jakoh, and Lil’ Tokyo Jiro of Onizuka Tattoo to follow.

CATALOG

An accompanying 200-page color catalog featuring essays and works by all participating artists will be published and available for sale

ADDITIONAL DESIGNS

Stickers, tenugui (traditional Japanese handkerchief), posters, and temporary tattoos designed by Chris Brand, Horitaka, Horitomo, Miyazo, Shige, Junko Shimada and Yokohama Horiken will also be available.

ARTIST/CURATOR BIOS

Kip Fulbeck is the author of several books, including Part Asian, 100% Hapa (Chronicle Books, 2006) and Permanence: Tattoo Portraits by Kip Fulbeck (Chronicle Books, 2008). He has exhibited and performed throughout the U.S. and abroad, including solo exhibitions at the Japanese American National Museum, Invisible NYC Gallery, Space180 Gallery, Ghettogloss Gallery, Asia Society Houston, and the Oregon Nikkei Legacy Center. A professor of Art at UCSB, he has been featured on CNN, MTV, The TODAY Show, and National Public Radio.

Shodai Horitaka (Takahiro Kitamura) is the author of numerous books on tattooing, including Tattooing from Japan to the West (Schiffer Publishing, 2004) and Tattoos of the Floating World: Ukiyo-E Motifs in Japanese Tattoo (KIT Publishers, 2003). He is the owner and founding tattooer at State of Grace Tattoo in San Jose, as well as the co-founder and director of the annual Bay Area Convention of the Tattoo Arts. Kitamura is renown for his advocacy of Japanese tattooing, and has given lectures and worked as a visiting tattooer worldwide.

FEATURED TATTOOER BIOS

Chris Brand is a southern California native and one of the world’s leading tattooers. He has worked with tattoo legend Jack Rudy at the famed Tattooland in Anaheim for over a decade. He is the co-author of The Ulysses Guide to the LA River (GK Editions, 2008) and an avid muralist as well as consummate artist. He brings a unique perspective to Japanese tattooing and showcases some of the most original work to date, including Chicano/Latino interpretations of traditional Japanese styles.

Horitaka (Takahiro Kitamura)

Please see Artist/Curator bio

Horitomo (Kazuaki Kitamura) has been at the forefront of a new breed of Japanese tattooers for well over a decade. He co-founded Three Tides Tattoo in Osaka in 1997, and later worked as an apprentice for Horiyoshi III in Yokohama. He has drawn designs for numerous companies and products, including Sega Game Systems, and is the author of Immovable: Fudo Myo-o Tattoo Design by Horitomo (State of Grace, 2011). In 2006, he received an artist of extraordinary talent visa from the U.S. State Department to tattoo in the U.S. Since that time, he has worked at State of Grace Tattoo in San Jose and is now a permanent resident.

Miyazo (Masao Miyazaki) is widely considered one of Japan’s premiere traditional tattooers. Based in Osaka, a city well known in the world of Japanese tattooing, he is the only heir to the famed Horitsune lineage. Miyazo exemplifies the regional style of bold tattooing and at a young age is considered by many worldwide to be a master tattooer.

Shige (Shigenori Iwasaki) Perhaps more than any other tattooer, Shige embodies the synthesis of traditional Japanese tattoo with contemporary European new school stylistics. His tattoo work and paintings have been praised worldwide, and his work has been featured in magazines, conventions, museums and galleries. A monograph of his work, entitledShige, was published in 2009 by State of Grace, with the hardcover edition quickly selling out. He is based in Yokohama.

Junko Shimada Originally from Japan, Shimada is a pioneer in Japanese tattooing, receiving a full body suit in the 1980’s (extremely rare for a woman at the time). She tattoos at Diamond Club Tattoo in San Francisco, and has lectured at museums and conventions nationwide. She possesses unparalleled inside knowledge of both the Japanese and American tattoo worlds and is recognized as the most important woman in Japanese tattooing.

Yokohama Horiken (Kenji Hori) Originally from Yokohama, Horiken is a renowned tebori (hand tattoo) specialist, one of only a few residing in the U.S. His work has been shown internationally, and he has been featured in numerous magazines including a 10-page feature in the prestigious Tattoo Artist Magazine. Also a recipient of the extraordinary talent visa, Horiken is a graduate of Tama Art College.

For more information, press packets, and interview requests, please contact:

Koji Sakai, Program Manager

Japanese American National Museum

213.830.5653

ksakai@janm.org

janm.org/tattooshow

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Maybe this is why:

"Horiyoshi III

FYI

as of April 2009-

i am no longer an apprentice of Horiyoshi III

i and my shop have absolutely nothing to do with Horiyoshi III

i wish him continued success and the best for the future

that is all i have to say about it

sincerely,

Takahiro Kitamura

Horitaka

State of Grace"

Horiyoshi III by taki/horitaka on Myspace

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The most frustrating part is the wait. 1 year away.

Another frustrating part is trying to finish work in time for the photo shoots!

I'm SO FUCKING STOKED to have been asked to be part of this.

The exhibition will be amazing but the catalog will be on a different level.

So much of what most modern Western tattooers and customers know about Japanese tattooing is because of Taki (Shodai Horitaka) - He has published invaluable books at affordable prices that we (Japanese tattoo lovers) have all benefitted from. He has also published books about other styles of tattooing that were awesome. If that isn't enough, he was also responsible for most of my favourite interviews in Tattoo Life magazine with some of my favourite American tattooers.

Many of his books form key parts of a tattooer's library. They stand well on their own but also are perfect as jumping-off points to delve deeper into the subjects if you're that way inclined. I think the Perseverance catalog will do the same.

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Another frustrating part is trying to finish work in time for the photo shoots!

I'm SO FUCKING STOKED to have been asked to be part of this.

The exhibition will be amazing but the catalog will be on a different level.

So much of what most modern Western tattooers and customers know about Japanese tattooing is because of Taki (Shodai Horitaka) - He has published invaluable books at affordable prices that we (Japanese tattoo lovers) have all benefitted from. He has also published books about other styles of tattooing that were awesome. If that isn't enough, he was also responsible for most of my favourite interviews in Tattoo Life magazine with some of my favourite American tattooers.

Many of his books form key parts of a tattooer's library. They stand well on their own but also are perfect as jumping-off points to delve deeper into the subjects if you're that way inclined. I think the Perseverance catalog will do the same.

I cosign all of the above. One of the best things about getting my back done by Jill Bonny is that I got to hang out at State of Grace on a regular basis. Over time, Taki and I got to know each other, and in addition to everything Stewart said, I can add that he's a great guy, loyal to a fault, and with as much integrity as anyone I've ever met. I'm sure that this project will be nothing short of mindblowing.

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Plenty of time to plan a trip! ;)

That is pure gospel! Taki, and Jill, and the rest of the Shop Crew don't know just much I and many others owe them. The books they've published, what I've learned from reading them, as well as being tattooed by Jill, and just being in the shop has enriched my life in subtle ways. Great knowledge and greater respect in that place!

...And as frustrated as I am to wait for this show, I was talking to Jill and Taki, and they were explaining how a year is really a very brief amount of time in order for this exhibit to be organized. Especially for the artists involved, having to finish the tattoos. I know Jill's trying to work on mine and a couple others so they can somehow be a part of it. If possible it'll be an honor to be a part of this in even the most passive of ways.

Thanks @Stewart Robson too for your contributions here and being a part of this exhibit. This show should stir up a lot of excitement.

Edit: Oops, meant to reply to Stewart's post but yes, a year's time is plenty of time to plan a trip. So now there's no excuse for anyone not to plan a vacation!

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Can't wait. Hey, @Stewart Robson -- any chance of you coming out to L.A. for it? I'd love to get tattooed by you!

I'd like to but I'm not sure if I'd be tattooing if I visited for the exhibition. I hope to do the Long Beach show next year as well as the usual SFO convention in October.

If you email me at stewartrobson@gmail.com and let me know which cities you can get to, when I'm planning trips I can let you know.

Thanks.

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@hogg I can't stop looking at pics of your backpiece (in non-creepy way). It's gorgeous. And just one of the many gorgeous tattoos I see on this forum and I CANNOT FUCKING WAIT FOR THIS EXHBIT! I seriously nearly wet my pants when I saw the flyer. I thought it was a joke or something - how many awesome tattooists can you fit in one show? (A shit ton, apparently).

@Stewart Robson I'm super stoked that you are a part of this show too!:) (admirer from a far) (also in a non-creepy way) ;)

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Have an appointment today at the Museum to have pics taken of my Stewart Robson back-piece. Not exactly sure how it works regarding which pieces get displayed. I am honored to have such a beautiful piece from Mr. Robson and the chance to display it.

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Have an appointment today at the Museum to have pics taken of my Stewart Robson back-piece. Not exactly sure how it works regarding which pieces get displayed. I am honored to have such a beautiful piece from Mr. Robson and the chance to display it.

You too? I'll be there later today as well. Although I have no idea where at the museum I'm supposed to go to. Maybe I'll get a chance to say Hi and see that back of yours too.

Agreed, it's an honor to be able to be a part of this in any capacity and display my artist's work as well.

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You too? I'll be there later today as well. Maybe I'll get a chance to say Hi and see that back of yours too.

That'd would be great. I'm there at 9:40. What time are you?

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I was just at JANM, where they were photographing some Chris Brand back pieces. Everyone should get excited about this come next Spring. Plan your vacations and book your tickets now if you live outside of LA. This is going to be cool.

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