Jump to content

Preferred tebori styles


taaarro
 Share

Recommended Posts

Dear admins, if this is too basic a question for a thread, or if it has been covered elsewhere please delete it.

Until very recently, I appreciated Japanese style tattoos, but was totally uninterested in getting them. It probably had lot to do with growing up in Tokyo and living here again now. Ever since a tattooer friend recommended (or implanted the idea of) getting a thigh done tebori "for the experience," I've been semi-obsessing about it. Who are your favorite tebori artists and why? It seems the styles, from the width of the windbars and palette, to drawing styles, are so varied. Do you like the artists doing classic work or the younger artists making "innovative" work? Some younger Japanese tattooers seem to be heading in a SSTP direction of simplification, where ultimately, classic tattooing, whether Japanese or American, becomes almost the same (except in subject matter). Some others' works seem too anime-influenced for my tastes. Even among older artists of a similar region, there's also a lot of variety. For example, Horitoshi I's work looks completely different from Horikyo's works and they are both Tokyo-based.

Just curious about all your opinions.

Horikyo

314804_154469321309646_100002397379104_263408_548801656_n.jpg

Horitoshi 1

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I love the tebori work of the Horitoshi Family from Horitoshi 1, Horimitsu, ShunHo, and Shinji Horizakura. The depth of the black wind bars are amazing the colors are so vivid and bold.

However my favorite tebori tattooer is actually US based now, Horitomo. I feel he is doing his best works these days and hoping one day to be able to get something from him:

4c69c77041af11e3871d22000a1f92db_8.jpg

b2566640230c11e3b5c422000a1f9a53_7.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Horimasa Tosui from the Horitoshi Family is my favourite. In my opinion his doing some of the best Tebori oneshots (and big work) in the business. It´s very easy to recognize that his master is Horitoshi 1;

996716_657240817624976_397420074_n.jpg

969014_646195572062834_396945602_n.jpg

285526_270035763012152_5798504_n.jpg

These are 12 years old. Look how bright they still are;

426103_393442074004853_1751831439_n.jpg

216671_216967391652323_5577146_n.jpg

I got this one from him earlier this year:

bakuLST_zps40e7f348.jpg?t=1373829779

I also love alot of other Tebori-artists, some of them are mentioned over here. Horizakura, Horitomo..

Link to post
Share on other sites

I like Horimitsu of the Horitoshi Family a lot. His colors are also very vivid and bright. His designs take on an abstract approach at times to traditional Japanese tebori themes. I've follow his Instagram religiously. Missed out on an opportunity to get tattooed by him at this past NYC Tattoo Convention. Hopefully he'll come to the next one!

blogger-image-1793147611.jpg

 

DSC_1099.JPG

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I like the work of Nakamura Toshikazu also and it's a little different in style from the others above . Here's a link to his site and if you want to view his portfolio click the first grey box with Japanese writing in it , he's also on IG . Also I've previously posted pieces from him in the chest / torso thread .

http://shisei2011.web.fc2.com/

Link to post
Share on other sites

I had pleasure to be tattooed two times on my leg by Bunshin Horitoshi, one in London Convention and another in her home-studio in Tokyo, is an amazing tattooer and very nice guy.

Other young tattooers that I deeply admire are Horimomo and Bunshin Yozin (Yozin Irezumi facebook name), they make really strong and bold works.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Strictly speaking japanese style artists who do tebori, I'd agree with what @ironchef said. Anyone from the Horitoshi family is amazing. Lately I've been pretty fixated on all of them.

@kylegrey also mentioned him but Nakamura Toshikazu also intrigues me. His style seems more classic and simpler.

Horitomo however is talent incarnate. He's definitely the favorite of mine.

Link to post
Share on other sites

@kylegrey, Yes I am totally interested in Toshikazu Nakamura's work. It seems very old school. I'm thinking that as a Tokyo native, I want to go to a Tokyo artist though. @ironchef I'm interested in Horimitsu's work too. The red dragon back piece he did is phenomenal. Very progressive take on mikiri.

Horimitsu-Style-01.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

That Horitomo front piece on Mike Rubendall is stunning. I am a huge fan of his work, his take on traditional Japanese has a elegance and power rivaled by none I think.

I love the tebori work of the Horitoshi Family from Horitoshi 1, Horimitsu, ShunHo, and Shinji Horizakura. The depth of the black wind bars are amazing the colors are so vivid and bold.

However my favorite tebori tattooer is actually US based now, Horitomo. I feel he is doing his best works these days and hoping one day to be able to get something from him:

4c69c77041af11e3871d22000a1f92db_8.jpg

b2566640230c11e3b5c422000a1f9a53_7.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm going to ask some stupid questions, but first are there any good documentaries, books, or other media where I can learn more about Japanese tattooing that anyone can recommend? I have gleaned a lot from this forum alone, but I just want to learn more.

You might think that since I have a back piece, and I'm eventually working toward a body suit, that I would know more than what I really do. When it comes to family tattooing, for example "the Horitoshi family", are they legitimate family, or is it sort of an honorary title for being an apprentice? And when does the Horitoshi name get passed down? Does Horitoshi 1 bestow it on his death bed? Retirement? Will there ever be a Horitoshi 2, or a Horiyoshi 4?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm going to ask some stupid questions, but first are there any good documentaries, books, or other media where I can learn more about Japanese tattooing that anyone can recommend? I have gleaned a lot from this forum alone, but I just want to learn more.

You might think that since I have a back piece, and I'm eventually working toward a body suit, that I would know more than what I really do. When it comes to family tattooing, for example "the Horitoshi family", are they legitimate family, or is it sort of an honorary title for being an apprentice? And when does the Horitoshi name get passed down? Does Horitoshi 1 bestow it on his death bed? Retirement? Will there ever be a Horitoshi 2, or a Horiyoshi 4?

I am super far from being knowledgeable about this so treat my recommendations with a good amount of skepticism, but I'd recommend Horitaka's Bushido: Legacies of the Japanese Tattoo to begin with. It's really focused on Horiyoshi 3 but I think it gives a pretty good overview of traditional Japanese tattooing, it covers the nomenclature of it, it has a lot of beautiful photos of Horiyoshi 3's tattoos, and it's pretty inexpensive and easy to buy. I'd also pay attention to Crystal Morey and Gomineko Books. She sells a lot of reference books for tattooers and publishes books herself. I am currently waiting to receive a book she published about Horiyoshi 3 and his relationship to Japanese Buddhism that looks pretty amazing. Crystal is also super cool and knowledgeable and travels around to a lot of conventions and is always super helpful. Her instagram is worth following too because she posts a lot of flipthroughs of the books she sells. She'll also sometimes offer sales on the books she publishes...up to 50% off kind of stuff...so they're really good deals.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It is my understanding that when Horiyoshi III retires (for example), he'll pass the mantle onto his chosen successor, who will then take on the name Horiyoshi IV. I believe Horiyoshi III's successor will be his son. The "family" is the name of the master/teacher and subsequent apprentices (current/former.) The names are "hori" which means to etch/engrave and then the latter part is some kind of play, typically, of the tattooer's name - to then create a new name for the tattooer to work under/as. So it's partly a "real" name and partly a created one. I know very very little about this subject as well, am looking forward to learning more about this too.

I got Horitaka's Ukiyo-e and tattoos book last month, nice read and photos.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am super far from being knowledgeable about this so treat my recommendations with a good amount of skepticism, but I'd recommend Horitaka's Bushido: Legacies of the Japanese Tattoo to begin with. It's really focused on Horiyoshi 3 but I think it gives a pretty good overview of traditional Japanese tattooing, it covers the nomenclature of it, it has a lot of beautiful photos of Horiyoshi 3's tattoos, and it's pretty inexpensive and easy to buy. I'd also pay attention to Crystal Morey and Gomineko Books. She sells a lot of reference books for tattooers and publishes books herself. I am currently waiting to receive a book she published about Horiyoshi 3 and his relationship to Japanese Buddhism that looks pretty amazing. Crystal is also super cool and knowledgeable and travels around to a lot of conventions and is always super helpful. Her instagram is worth following too because she posts a lot of flipthroughs of the books she sells. She'll also sometimes offer sales on the books she publishes...up to 50% off kind of stuff...so they're really good deals.

I bought that Horiyoshi 3 and Buddhism book too from Crystal...nothing beats a SALE!!!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm going to ask some stupid questions, but first are there any good documentaries, books, or other media where I can learn more about Japanese tattooing that anyone can recommend? I have gleaned a lot from this forum alone, but I just want to learn more.

You might think that since I have a back piece, and I'm eventually working toward a body suit, that I would know more than what I really do. When it comes to family tattooing, for example "the Horitoshi family", are they legitimate family, or is it sort of an honorary title for being an apprentice? And when does the Horitoshi name get passed down? Does Horitoshi 1 bestow it on his death bed? Retirement? Will there ever be a Horitoshi 2, or a Horiyoshi 4?

I'm no expert. I defer to any artist or non who can lead you in a better direction. Traditional Japanese can be hard to understand because there are certain things only done in a particular fashion by a particular Family in a specific region. There are Family differences and regional ones.A good example might be how low the back piece extends or how much the chest is covered. Some extend just above the nipple, while others cover the whole pectoral. What might be right and proper in the south and for one particular Family could vary widely from say a Family located in the northern region of Japan. That said I really enjoy these books below (there are many more out there too):

Bushido by Horitaka

Studying Horiyoshi III by Jill Mandelbaum

Horitoshi I by Roberto Borsi

Bunshin II (about Horitsune II) published by Tätowier Magazin

A History of Japanese Body Suit Tattooing (focuses on Horikazu) by Mark Poysden & Marco Bratt

Horikazu published by Edition Reuss

Also I haven't seen a copy yet but "Wabori" appears like it might be interesting. There was a post on a few days ago under the media section. I believe iron chef posted it. Horikitsune's books look like they might be worth an investment too. But I've never actually had the chance to see them.

Sorry, too lazy to post the actual links. I'll have to let you do some legwork.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm going to ask some stupid questions, but first are there any good documentaries, books, or other media where I can learn more about Japanese tattooing that anyone can recommend? I have gleaned a lot from this forum alone, but I just want to learn more.

You might think that since I have a back piece, and I'm eventually working toward a body suit, that I would know more than what I really do. When it comes to family tattooing, for example "the Horitoshi family", are they legitimate family, or is it sort of an honorary title for being an apprentice? And when does the Horitoshi name get passed down? Does Horitoshi 1 bestow it on his death bed? Retirement? Will there ever be a Horitoshi 2, or a Horiyoshi 4?

http://www.lastsparrowtattoo.com/forum/tattoo-tv-shows-documentaries-media/4760-horithoshi-i-full-documentary.html

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm no expert. I defer to any artist or non who can lead you in a better direction. Traditional Japanese can be hard to understand because there are certain things only done in a particular fashion by a particular Family in a specific region. There are Family differences and regional ones.A good example might be how low the back piece extends or how much the chest is covered. Some extend just above the nipple, while others cover the whole pectoral. What might be right and proper in the south and for one particular Family could vary widely from say a Family located in the northern region of Japan. That said I really enjoy these books below (there are many more out there too):

Bushido by Horitaka

Studying Horiyoshi III by Jill Mandelbaum

Horitoshi I by Roberto Borsi

Bunshin II (about Horitsune II) published by Tätowier Magazin

A History of Japanese Body Suit Tattooing (focuses on Horikazu) by Mark Poysden & Marco Bratt

Horikazu published by Edition Reuss

Also I haven't seen a copy yet but "Wabori" appears like it might be interesting. There was a post on a few days ago under the media section. I believe iron chef posted it. Horikitsune's books look like they might be worth an investment too. But I've never actually had the chance to see them.

Sorry, too lazy to post the actual links. I'll have to let you do some legwork.

I really want that Horitoshi I book. Is it available anywhere online at a decent price? Found a local shop that has it in stock, but at an inflated price.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmm, perhaps Horizakura is selling a few copies? I don't know for sure. I say that because I purchased mine at Diamond Club and I can remember seeing Brian Kaneko selling them as well. I assume someone with a Horitoshi connection might be selling them. Otherwise maybe Diamond Club could ship you one. The book was really not pricey at all from my recollection. It's really nice too.

- - - Updated - - -

Hmm, perhaps Horizakura is selling a few copies? I don't know for sure. I say that because I purchased mine at Diamond Club and I can remember seeing Brian Kaneko selling them as well. I assume someone with a Horitoshi connection might be selling them. Otherwise maybe Diamond Club could ship you one. The book was really not pricey at all from my recollection. It's really nice too.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Cork, the term Family is used in a way that we here in the west don't really use it. It is not blood, but also not quite honrary either. In the japanese tattoo family, it is a very strong bond of duty and honor similar to a blood family that encompasses the sinsei and his apprentices. As far as the title being passed on, I can't give you specifics other than the title is passed while the master is alive. Titles are given to the tattooers once the master deems them appropriate. I was friends with a tattooer that was part ofthe Horitoshi family in the mid 90's, and at the time he was Horitoshi III. He apparently left the family and the title was bestowed on another in the family from what I heard.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share




×
×
  • Create New...